Definition of lampoon in English:

lampoon

Line breaks: lam|poon
Pronunciation: /lamˈpuːn
 
/

verb

[with object]

noun

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Derivatives

lampooner

noun
More example sentences
  • He could almost have written the hymn himself - about himself - the lampooners are saying.
  • I can't wait for the lampooners to go to town on his lower lip-swivelling characteristics.
  • Similarly as a lyricist and polemicist he was both a consistent critic of corporate capitalism (in particular ‘the culture industry’ and organised religion) and a very spiky lampooner of new social movements.

lampoonery

noun
More example sentences
  • On the show he still refused to play the game, refused to step out of role, to relax into Ross's spree of commentary and lampoonery.
  • But some apt political lampoonery, a dash of adroit physical comedy, a pinch of puppetry and a few saucy tunes give Insanity Fair some entertaining moments.
  • Unfortunately, there's no time for lampoonery as the teams and their mascots click-clack out of the tunnel and line up on either side of the match officials.

lampoonist

noun
More example sentences
  • Satire can be as cruel as it likes: cartoonists, lampoonists, Spitting Image - whatever.
  • His apotheosis as a political lampoonist is to be found in what is considered to be by many the best Marx Brothers movie: Duck Soup.

Origin

mid 17th century: from French lampon, said to be from lampons 'let us drink' (used as a refrain), from lamper 'gulp down', nasalized form of laper 'to lap (liquid)'.

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