There are 4 main definitions of lime in English:

Share this entry

lime 1

Line breaks: lime

noun

1 (also quicklime) [mass noun] A white caustic alkaline substance consisting of calcium oxide, which is obtained by heating limestone and which combines with water with the production of much heat.
Example sentences
  • By pressing a button on the bottom, water mixes with quicklime, producing a chemical reaction that heats the coffee.
  • Kathleen Jamie should have used quicklime rather than caustic soda to deflesh her gannet's skull, but maggots would have been best.
  • In the laboratory higher concentration ethanol, with less water, can be produced by refluxing the rectified spirit with quicklime and then distilling the alcohol mixture.
1.1 (also slaked lime) A white alkaline substance consisting of calcium hydroxide, made by adding water to quicklime and used in traditional building methods to make plaster, mortar, and limewash.
Example sentences
  • Well-versed in building and building materials, he used a traditional mortar of lime and sand to decorate his small cottage with shells.
  • Check whether your building or part of it is constructed with any of the traditional building materials like lime, laterite, granite, wood, mud or the like.
  • Thin slices of the nut, either natural or processed, may be mixed with a variety of substances including slaked lime (calcium hydroxide) and spices such as cardamom, coconut, and saffron.
1.2(In general use) any of a number of calcium compounds, especially calcium hydroxide, used as an additive to soil or water.
Example sentences
  • In its pure form it is a light, whitish metal; but it is seldom thus seen because it reacts violently with water to form lime (calcium hydroxide).
  • Additionally, lime enables soils that are not productive to become effective.
  • In general, lime does not move downward further than plow depth in an organic soil.
2 archaic Birdlime.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Treat (soil or water) with lime to reduce acidity and improve fertility or oxygen levels: they were liming acidified lakes
More example sentences
  • Soil is limed in some areas to improve barley growth and productivity on acid soils, but this practice is often economically unfeasible.
  • The soil was limed by applying 5 • 5 g CaCO 3 kg - 1 soil.
  • The rest will become available over time, and many nutrients will also become more available when a soil is limed.
1.1 (often as adjective limed) Give (wood) a bleached appearance by treating it with lime: limed oak dining furniture
More example sentences
  • A room currently used as a study, but which could also make a third bedroom, also has a cast-iron fireplace as well as built-in presses and limed tongue-and-groove floorboards.
  • Beds are set on platforms or suspended from ceilings, bathtubs are hewn from blocks of black granite or pale limestone, and the bare wood floorboards are wide, limed and lacquered.
  • The kitchen, to the rear, has limed oak units at ground and eye level, a tiled worktop and splashback.
2 archaic Catch (a bird) with birdlime: the bird that hath been limed in a bush

Origin

Old English līm, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch lijm, German Leim, also to loam.

More
  • lemon from Middle English:

    The root of lemon and also lime (mid 17th century) is an Arabic word, lim, that was a collective term for citrus fruit. On fruit machines the lemon is the least valuable symbol, and this may be behind the answer is a lemon ‘the response or outcome is unsatisfactory’. Especially in the USA, a lemon may be a substandard or defective car, of the type all too often bought from shady used-car dealers.

Derivatives

limy

1
Pronunciation: /ˈlʌɪmi/
adjective (limier, limiest)
Example sentences
  • In the garden it likes sun or partial shade and well-drained acid soil - like most Ericas it dislikes being grown in limy conditions.
  • Limy soil does not affect the colour of their flowers as it does mopheads (blue mopheads tend to turn pink in limy soils).
  • The stone that makes up the cliff face is known as limy sandstone, a sedimentary rock.

Words that rhyme with lime

begrime, Chaim, chime, climb, clime, crime, dime, grime, half-time, I'm, mime, mistime, part-time, prime, rhyme, rime, slime, sublime, sub-prime, thyme, time

Definition of lime in:

Share this entry

 

There are 4 main definitions of lime in English:

Share this entry

lime 2 Line breaks: lime

noun

1A rounded citrus fruit similar to a lemon but greener, smaller, and with a distinctive acid flavour: roughly chop two limes [mass noun]: wedges of lime [as modifier]: lime juice
More example sentences
  • Surprisingly complex for one so young, delivering flavours of spice, limes, lemons, orange peel and oatmeal, all harmoniously threaded with ripe acidity.
  • The citric acid in lemons or limes has a similar effect, although this is not called ‘cooking’.
  • Oranges, lemons, limes, mandarins or other citrus fruit from Queensland will be banned from entering any other state or territory, threatening at least $100 million worth of fruit still to be picked in the state.
1.1 [mass noun] A drink made from or flavoured with lime juice: lager and lime
More example sentences
  • Her favourite drink right now is vodka, lime and soda.
  • I changed my drinks, brandy, lime and soda now and different pretty little cigs in pretty packets.
  • Blackcurrent cordial for lime, lemonade for soda.
2 (also lime tree) The evergreen citrus tree which produces limes, widely cultivated in warm climates.
  • Citrus aurantifolia, family Rutaceae
Example sentences
  • In the same way, every small home in the Caribbean has always kept some vegetables and a fruit tree (usually a lime, but also other citrus).
  • In the western zone, oranges, limes, and bananas are cultivated.
  • It belongs to the citrus family, Rutaceae, but is not a true lime.
3 (also lime green) [mass noun] A bright light green colour like that of a lime: [as modifier]: a lime-green bikini
More example sentences
  • Big colours include pink, lime green, bright blues and more sombre chocolate browns and off whites.
  • We contemplated lots of different colors before settling on some sort of lime green or apple green.
  • Now I have on a bright neon lime green T-shirt and I'm not a small girl, so you can't miss me.

Origin

Mid 17th century: from French, from modern Provençal limo, Spanish lima, from Arabic līma; compare with lemon.

More
  • lemon from Middle English:

    The root of lemon and also lime (mid 17th century) is an Arabic word, lim, that was a collective term for citrus fruit. On fruit machines the lemon is the least valuable symbol, and this may be behind the answer is a lemon ‘the response or outcome is unsatisfactory’. Especially in the USA, a lemon may be a substandard or defective car, of the type all too often bought from shady used-car dealers.

Definition of lime in:

Share this entry

 

There are 4 main definitions of lime in English:

Share this entry

lime 3 Line breaks: lime
(also lime tree)

noun

A deciduous tree with heart-shaped leaves and fragrant yellowish blossom, native to north temperate regions. The pale timber is used for carving and inexpensive furniture. Also called linden.
Example sentences
  • Since 2000, 32 different species of tree have been planted including oak, ash, small-leaved limes and bird cherry, while a carpet of bluebells and daffodils has also been sown.
  • The gardens which surround the property include beech, lime and holm oak trees while in the eastern corner is an ancient churchyard.
  • Some willow trees will be lost by the development but trees like hornbeam, lime and birch will remain with preservation orders on them.

Origin

Early 17th century: alteration of obsolete line, from Old English lind (see linden).

More
  • lemon from Middle English:

    The root of lemon and also lime (mid 17th century) is an Arabic word, lim, that was a collective term for citrus fruit. On fruit machines the lemon is the least valuable symbol, and this may be behind the answer is a lemon ‘the response or outcome is unsatisfactory’. Especially in the USA, a lemon may be a substandard or defective car, of the type all too often bought from shady used-car dealers.

Definition of lime in:

Share this entry

 

There are 4 main definitions of lime in English:

Share this entry

lime 4 Line breaks: lime
West Indian

verb

[no object, with adverbial]
Sit or stand around talking with others: boys and girls were liming along the roadside as if they didn’t have anything to do
More example sentences
  • Police reports stated that at around 6.45 pm, Phillip, 21, was liming near the basketball court at upper Gokool Street, Diego Martin, when a man approached him and fired several shots.
  • And at 1 am yesterday, a Dibe, Long Circular resident, who was recently released from prison was gunned down as he was liming outside his home.
  • Those involved in the investigation said Sean, was liming with two friends near his home around 7 am.

noun

Back to top  
An informal social gathering characterized by semi-ritualized talking.
Example sentences
  • But Trinis are such that they will continue to go to Carnival shows and fêtes and dinners and limes with their friends, and so on.
  • Take the case of a small lime hosted on Friday 13 by jazz pianist Raf Robertson.
  • On Tuesday night last week, Natty and I enjoyed ourselves immensely at a little lime in our complex.

Origin

Origin uncertain; said to be from Limey (because of the number of British sailors present during the Second World War), or from suck a lime, expressing bitterness at not being invited to a gathering.

More
  • lemon from Middle English:

    The root of lemon and also lime (mid 17th century) is an Arabic word, lim, that was a collective term for citrus fruit. On fruit machines the lemon is the least valuable symbol, and this may be behind the answer is a lemon ‘the response or outcome is unsatisfactory’. Especially in the USA, a lemon may be a substandard or defective car, of the type all too often bought from shady used-car dealers.

Definition of lime in:

Share this entry

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day coiffeur
Pronunciation: kwäˈfər
noun
a hairdresser