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loyal

Line breaks: loyal
Pronunciation: /ˈlɔɪəl
 
/

Definition of loyal in English:

adjective

Giving or showing firm and constant support or allegiance to a person or institution: he remained loyal to the government loyal service
More example sentences
  • Followers electing a king were also proclaiming themselves as his loyal supporters.
  • Don't get me wrong, that's not meant as a criticism of those loyal fans who turned up to watch the game.
  • Many of his most loyal backers have now left the Commons and, at 65, his age is now an issue.
Synonyms

Origin

mid 16th century: from French, via Old French loial from Latin legalis (see legal).

More
  • law from (Old English):

    The words legacy (Late Middle English), legal (Late Middle English), legitimate (Late Middle English), and loyal (early 16th century) all descend from Latin lex ‘law’, the source also of law. The phrase law and order is found from the late 16th century. It was Charles Dickens who first said the law is an ass, or rather his character Mr Bumble did in Oliver Twist: ‘“If the law supposes that,” said Mr Bumble…“the law is a ass…a idiot.”’ See also jungle

Derivatives

loyally

1
adverb
Example sentences
  • They continue to do their job loyally and faithfully.
  • Mary recalls edging nervously into the venue's makeshift temple, loyally carrying a letter for Paul which her friend Christa had entrusted to her.
  • For 24 years, he belonged to the Indonesian military, which loyally followed the president's orders.

Words that rhyme with loyal

royal, viceroyal

Definition of loyal in:

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