Definition of malleable in English:

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malleable

Pronunciation: /ˈmalɪəb(ə)l/

adjective

1(Of a metal or other material) able to be hammered or pressed into shape without breaking or cracking: a malleable metal can be beaten into a sheet
More example sentences
  • Industrial and commercial fittings are made from galvanized steel, cast iron, or malleable steel.
  • This allows the clay to form a malleable material.
  • I envied how the material was so malleable compared to wood and that one could get so close to it.
Synonyms
pliable, ductile, plastic, pliant, soft, workable, shapable, mouldable, tractile, tensile
1.1Easily influenced; pliable: they are as malleable and easily led as sheep
More example sentences
  • It scares people and people who are scared are more malleable, more easily led.
  • Sometimes, however, these natives can be a tad too malleable and easily persuaded by those in their inner circle.
  • But Anna is sexually malleable and could easily be taken advantage of by an unscrupulous dominant.
Synonyms
easily influenced, suggestible, susceptible, impressionable, amenable, cooperative, adaptable, compliant, pliable, tractable, accommodating;
biddable, docile, obedient, complaisant, manageable, manipulable, persuadable, governable, influenceable, like putty in someone's hands

Derivatives

malleability

Pronunciation: /malɪəˈbɪlɪti/
noun
Example sentences
  • We will discuss the malleability of human nature.
  • The Inca, by contrast, valued ‘plasticity, malleability, and toughness.’
  • The cognitive psychologist Elizabeth Loftus has been vilified for publishing groundbreaking data on the malleability of memory.

malleably

adverb
Example sentences
  • But academic ability and/or intelligence is both spikier and more malleably constructed than such an analogy allows.
  • My heart gave in malleably like a raw piece of argil to the tender touch of his love.
  • Subsequently, the crop spread around Europe and Asia where it malleably transformed into the many cruciferous crops we know today.

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense 'able to be hammered'): via Old French from medieval Latin malleabilis, from Latin malleus 'a hammer'.

For editors and proofreaders

Line breaks: mal|le¦able

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