There are 3 definitions of mate in English:

mate1

Line breaks: mate
Pronunciation: /meɪt
 
/

noun

  • 1The sexual partner of a bird or other animal: a male bird sings to court a mate
    More example sentences
    • He then told them that he would take all steps necessary so that the zoo gets new species of animals and mates for those animals that are single now.
    • Both admitted intentionally killing a wild bird, injuring its mate and having a loaded air rifle without lawful authority.
    • Andean condor Homer and his mate Marge are love birds again - after vets gave him a blunter beak to save her from the sharp side of his temper.
  • 1.1 informal A person’s husband, wife, or other sexual partner: he couldn’t satisfy his frisky young mate
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    • She said if we treated our husbands / mates like we treated our pet dogs, our marriages would be happier.
    • I mean, that's terrible to lose a life partner and a mate at any age, but certainly at a young age like that.
    • From this perspective, the problem of your missus or your mate takes on added significance.
  • 1.2 informal One of a matched pair: a sock without its mate
    More example sentences
    • Have you ever wondered as to the whereabouts of the mate to those odd socks you find in the dryer or your sock drawer?
  • 4chiefly British An assistant or deputy in certain trades: a plumber’s mate
    More example sentences
    • We had no lifting training and were not provided with driver's mates to assist with the lifting involved.
    • She's now an aviation electrician's mate and soon will start in the shop for electricians.
    Synonyms
    assistant, helper, apprentice, subordinate; collaborator, accomplice, aider and abetter
    informal sidekick
  • 4.1An officer on a merchant ship subordinate to the master. See also first mate.
    More example sentences
    • The same applied to the sailing master, his mate, and the carpenter when they also arrived.
    • The ship's mates would be here at any minute, and I would lose my charter to Antwerp if I was caught.
    • When a sailor ‘belonged’ to a ship his main loyalty was to his ship and his mates.

verb

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  • 2Connect or be connected mechanically: [with object]: the four-cylinder engine is mated to a five-speed gearbox
    More example sentences
    • It is a 16 valve, four-cylinder 2.0-litre turbo charged engine mated to a six-speed gear box.
    • While being basically hand-built, they were done on an assembly line, with the mechanicals being mated to the body shell around half way down the line.
    • Backplanes permit drives to be snapped in and mated to a connector blindly.

Phrases

mates' rates

informal Discounted prices or preferential terms offered to friends by the seller of a product or service: Rick arranged for the repair to be done at mates' rates
More example sentences
  • I bought it off a friend at mate's rates.
  • Joe, tell him George sent you and you'll easily get mates' rates.
  • It provided billions in aid, free military hardware, latest intelligence support and some of the best mates' rates in international politics.

Derivatives

mateless

adjective
More example sentences
  • Never fear, secluded mateless types: through some meticulous research I have developed some foolproof methods of wooing.
  • Single women who find themselves mateless during their usual ‘prime’ years will now have time to build a better life to support themselves and their children (later, and with or without partners).
  • Elsewhere Dylan looks to celebrate freedom for the ‘mistreated mateless mother, the mistitled prostitute’, the ‘gentle and the kind’, and for all those who he sees to be on the outside of a harsh and unkind society.

Origin

late Middle English: from Middle Low German māt(e) 'comrade', of West Germanic origin; related to meat (the underlying concept being that of eating together).

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Word of the day coloratura
Pronunciation: ˌkələrəˈto͝orə
noun
elaborate ornamentation of a vocal melody

There are 3 definitions of mate in English:

mate2

Line breaks: mate
Pronunciation: /meɪt
 
/

noun & verb

Chess
  • short for checkmate.
    More example sentences
    • He carelessly walked into a mate in five, which he thought was simply drawing.
    • This book starts with mates in one and, around page one million, moves on to mate in twos.
    • He wasn't paying attention since he saw that a forced mate resulted from the line he actually played.

Phrases

fool's mate

A game in which White is mated by Black’s queen on the second move.

scholar's mate

A game in which White mates Black on the fourth move with the queen, supported by the king’s bishop.

Origin

Middle English: the noun from Anglo-Norman French mat (from the phrase eschec mat 'checkmate'); the verb from Anglo-Norman French mater 'to checkmate'.

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There are 3 definitions of mate in English:

maté

Line breaks: maté
Pronunciation: /ˈmateɪ
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
  • 1 (also maté tea) A bitter infusion of the leaves of a South American shrub, which is high in caffeine: maté has an agreeable slightly aromatic odor
    More example sentences
    • We drink it through a bombilla, the little metal suckable strainer they also use in Argentina to drink maté, an exuberantly undrinkable local tea brewed from some violent green shrub.
    • A popular social pastime is the drinking of maté, a tea made from the leaves of a plant related to holly.
    • Other dried plant substances used to make infused drinks are chicory (dried root), cocoa (dried powdered seeds), guarana (dried powdered seeds, made into smoked cakes), cola ‘nut’ (dried powdered seeds), and maté (dried leaves).
  • 1.1The leaves of the maté shrub.
  • 2 (also yerba maté) The South American shrub of the holly family which produces maté leaves.
    • Ilex paraguariensis, family Aquifoliaceae
    More example sentences
    • Drinks made of yerba maté are ubiquitous.

Origin

early 18th century: from Spanish mate, from Quechua mati.

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