Definition of mimosa in English:

mimosa

Line breaks: mi¦mosa
Pronunciation: /mɪˈməʊzə
 
, -sə/

noun

1An Australian acacia tree with delicate fern-like leaves and yellow flowers.
  • Acacia dealbata, family Leguminosae
More example sentences
  • They feed mainly on leaves of acacia and mimosa, using their 450 mm extendable tongues and mobile lips to secure their food.
  • He's credited with the introduction to the West of eucalyptus, acacia, mimosa, and the genus named after him, Banksia, all well known species in Australia where his mark was firmly left.
  • The gold lasted for barely a year but in the meantime numerous trees were planted in the area: wild acacia, teak, olive, tambotie, beech, ebony, seringa, mimosa and quince.
2A plant of a genus that includes the sensitive plant.
  • Genus Mimosa, family Leguminosae
More example sentences
  • Yesterday I added 4 Yellow Goat's Horn pepper seeds, my hop seeds and some mimosa pudica (sensitive plant) seed.
  • The main crops produced were roses, mimosas, carnations and chrysanthemums, as ornamental non-edible plants, and tomato, lettuce and basil, as edible ones.
  • I find it unsettling that Stalin used to toss breadballs at his wife during dinner, that he spoiled his children and that he loved growing mimosas.
3North American A drink of champagne and orange juice.
More example sentences
  • Some people I know drink that much in free champagne and mimosas.
  • They also offer a brunch on sea days between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. with mimosas, champagne, and wines in addition to a ‘Fruits of the Sea’ buffet.
  • Never miss an episode, unless it's right after the Superbowl and I've been drinking mimosas since noon.

Origin

modern Latin, apparently from Latin mimus 'mime' (because the plant seemingly mimics the sensitivity of an animal) + the feminine suffix -osa.

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