Definition of moderate in English:

moderate

Line breaks: mod¦er|ate

adjective

Pronunciation: /ˈmɒd(ə)rət
 
/

noun

Pronunciation: /ˈmɒd(ə)rət
 
/
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  • A person who holds moderate views, especially in politics: an unlikely alliance of radicals and moderates
    More example sentences
    • His greatest concern was that the Republicans would prove so reactionary that they would transform Democratic moderates and liberals into radicals and extremists.
    • Given the nature of the Greens and their issues, they typically demonstrate the best potential for harvesting votes in the districts already held by liberal Democrats or conscientious moderates.
    • Liberals and moderates in the Democratic Party have a lot to learn from each other.

verb

Pronunciation: /ˈmɒdəreɪt
 
/
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  • 2 [with object] British Review (examination papers, results, or candidates) in relation to an agreed standard so as to ensure consistency of marking: the dependability of an examining system rests on those who set, moderate, and mark the papers
  • 3 [with object] (In academic and ecclesiastical contexts) preside over (a deliberative body) or at (a debate): a panel moderated by a Harvard University law professor
    More example sentences
    • I received many similar responses after I moderated the vice presidential debates in 2004.
    • Now for our next week's e-mail question of the week - if you were moderating the presidential debates, what would you like to ask each candidate?
    • Because you write in the book, about the time I moderated the South Carolina debate with your son, and how you could not watch.
    Synonyms
    chair, take the chair of, preside over; arbitrate, mediate, referee, judge
  • 3.1 [no object] (Especially in the Presbyterian Church in Scotland) act as a moderator; preside: it is the Presbytery that moderates
    More example sentences
    • He tried to moderate, but seemed a bit distracted, quoting interviews more than asking questions.
    • The position of interviewer is the one with the authority to moderate, the emcee of the event.
  • 4Monitor (an Internet forum or online discussion) for inappropriate or offensive content.
    More example sentences
    • In addition, the association's executive director moderated an Internet chatroom for children.
    • To moderate a newsgroup you have to get involved several times a day, or it becomes too impractical to have conversations.
    • All they are doing is forcing users to go elsewhere, potentially to non moderated chat rooms with little or no protection.
  • 5 [with object] Physics Retard (neutrons) with a moderator: the neutrons causing fission are not moderated but react at high energies
    More example sentences
    • Dysprosium alloys are also used in control rods used to moderate the flow of neutrons through a nuclear reactor.
    • The detection of hydrogen is based both on the intensity of gamma rays emitted by hydrogen, and by the intensity of neutrons that are moderated by hydrogen.
    • It is then extracted from the ring and smashed into a mercury target to produce neutron beams that can be moderated and guided into designated experimental stations.

Derivatives

moderateness

noun
More example sentences
  • As the election gets closer, he is going to have to prove his moderateness to appeal to on-the-fence independents.
  • A large part of his credibility comes from his seeming moderateness in form and presentation.
  • The party had cultivated an image of moderateness, and had been unwilling or unable to have an effective negative element to its campaign.

moderatism

Pronunciation: /ˈmɒd(ə)rətɪz(ə)m/
noun
More example sentences
  • It's an incredibly humane, kind film, and it reminds you that being humane and kind will always lead to radicalism, never to moderatism.
  • On the Political spectrum scale, that intentionally skews towards moderatism, I scored 9 out of 10 in fiscal freedom and 7 out of 10 in social freedom.
  • Yet, by that time the Revolution had taken a different path and the forces of ‘moderatism’ became too strong.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin moderat- 'reduced, controlled', from the verb moderare; related to modest.

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