Definition of orthography in English:

orthography

Line breaks: or|thog¦raphy
Pronunciation: /ɔːˈθɒɡrəfi
 
/

noun (plural orthographies)

1The conventional spelling system of a language: a spoken language which has as yet no sanctioned orthography
More example sentences
  • In the case of Cquila there is a distinct suggestion of the orthographies of Southern Bantu languages like Zulu.
  • At least in some orthographies, semantics play a larger role in single-word naming than previously thought.
  • Those orthographies made it possible to write Chinese phonetically and to write spoken Japanese terms that had no equivalent Chinese characters.
1.1 [mass noun] The study of spelling and how letters combine to represent sounds and form words.
More example sentences
  • This does not deny the importance of work by linguists on problems of orthography.
  • All the foils were unrelated in meaning, sound, and orthography to the study sets.
  • But those attitudes belong to the past, along with grammar drills and orthography.
2 another term for orthographic projection.

Origin

late Middle English: via Old French and Latin from Greek orthographia, from orthos 'correct' + -graphia 'writing'.

Derivatives

orthographer

noun
sense 1.
More example sentences
  • Professional social scientists will regret that it has no tables and orthographers will wonder why Princeton's usually diligent proofreaders did not correct such solecisms as ‘multifaceted,’ and ‘Pentacostal.’

orthographic

Pronunciation: /-ˈɡrafɪk/
adjective
More example sentences
  • These results suggest that the acquisition of phonological skills is a necessary step in building the orthographic lexicon.
  • Just as a name must conform to the phonological system of the language, so the way it is written must conform to the orthographic conventions of the language.
  • Thus, orthographic differences now disguise what is a similar pronunciation and make the languages look more different in their written form than they are when spoken.

orthographical

Pronunciation: /-ˈɡrafɪk(ə)l/
adjective
More example sentences
  • Letters display the kind of orthographical and punctuational errors that one is supposed to have left behind by the tenth grade.
  • Personal names are part of any language and obey most of its general rules, whether phonological, morphological, syntactic, orthographical or semantic.
  • With him scientific scholarship really began, and his work covered the wide range of grammatical, etymological, orthographical, literary, and textual criticism.

orthographically

Pronunciation: /-ˈɡrafɪk(ə)li/
adverb
More example sentences
  • Overall, evidence from Hebrew shows indeed that these ambiguous letters are orthographically represented last and the weakest.
  • Inevitably, these sites are being called photologs (or, more commonly, the more orthographically challenged fotologs).
  • By ANALOGY, an intrusive r occurs where it is not etymologically or orthographically justified: sofa rhymes with gopher, but in The sofa/r is lost an r sound often intrudes.

Definition of orthography in:

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