Definition of pallid in English:

pallid

Line breaks: pal¦lid
Pronunciation: /ˈpalɪd
 
/

adjective

1(Of a person’s face) pale, typically because of poor health: his face, with its wrinkled, pallid complexion
More example sentences
  • Her mother was propped up against a pillow, her pallid face hardly standing out against the white background.
  • Complacent smiles linger on their pallid faces.
  • She glimpsed her mother lying feebly on a divan with a wrinkled, pallid face.
Synonyms
2Lacking vigour or intensity; insipid: a pallid ray of winter sun pallid liberalism
More example sentences
  • It just sat there on the plate, stolid, pallid, and completely lacking in anything even approaching meal appeal.
  • He mistakenly characterizes spirituality as a pallid Platonic flight from the world or some kind of interiorized religious stirrings.
  • Character designs are rather pallid and dull, completely uninteresting in style or drawn without any particular flare.
Synonyms

Origin

late 16th century: from Latin pallidus 'pale' (related to pallere 'be pale').

Derivatives

pallidity

Pronunciation: /-ˈlɪdɪti/
noun
More example sentences
  • Opposites cancel, the story falls flat, and pallidity ensues.
  • Such preparations are of much value where a mild stimulant and astringent is required, and especially in catarrhal disorders of the mucous tissues, with marked pallidity and relaxation.

pallidly

adverb
More example sentences
  • Other moments refer - too vaguely and too pallidly - to problems that might be resolved in couples’ counseling.
  • From a psychological perspective it's an acknowledged fact that vividly presented information is more likely to be retained and processed than pallidly presented information.
  • A careful historian working on a broad canvass, Harris's hypotheses are cautiously, perhaps somewhat pallidly, framed.

pallidness

noun
More example sentences
  • Sam's face paled even more, his pallidness contrasting violently with his raven hair.
  • The most common type of leprosy causes the pallidness of the skin which proves that people had to have melanin first in order for them to become leprous.
  • The subject is the pallidness of life in those who never manage to engage in more than a shadowy existence on the fringe of active life.

Definition of pallid in:

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