Definition of perdure in English:

perdure

Line breaks: per|dure
Pronunciation: /pəˈdjʊə
 
/

verb

[no object] formal , chiefly US
  • Remain in existence; endure: bell music has perdured in Venice throughout five centuries
    More example sentences
    • Even worse is the widespread impression that Science produces as an output a generic ‘thing’ which perdures through time, be it called ‘knowledge’ or ‘information’ or epistemic virtue.
    • The older nexus between self-improvement and traditional morality perdures as an undiminished factor in their worldview.
    • This belief has perdured without question in the Catholic Church to this day, and is repeated almost verbatim in the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

Derivatives

perdurance

noun
More example sentences
  • Developmentally early induction often yields no clones at all, suggesting that the small clones depend on perdurance of wild-type gene product from the heterozygous clone precursor cell.
  • However, it is equally possible that differences in allelic strength or perdurance of maternal contributions obscures the full range of phenotypes on the several components.
  • It could be argued, however, that the lack of embryonic or larval phenotypes could be due to a long-lasting perdurance of maternal deposits during oogenesis.

Origin

late 15th century: from Old French perdurer, from Latin perdurare 'endure', from per- 'through' + durare 'to last'.

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