There are 3 main definitions of pie in English:

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pie1

Line breaks: pie
Pronunciation: /pʌɪ
 
/

noun

A baked dish of fruit, or meat and vegetables, typically with a top and base of pastry: a meat pie [mass noun]: a good meal of hot pie and peas [as modifier]: a pie dish
More example sentences
  • Biscuits, cakes, pastries, meat pies, sausages, hard cheese, butter and foods containing lard, coconut or palm oil all tend to be high in saturated fats.
  • Put the potato into a piping bag with a 2cm plain nozzle and pipe on to the meat mixture in the pie dish.
  • Pour the cooled sauce over the chicken and vegetables in the pie dish and cover with puff pastry.
Synonyms

Origin

Middle English: probably the same word as pie2, the various combinations of ingredients being compared to objects randomly collected by a magpie.

More
  • The pie that is a dish with a pastry crust is the same as the pie in names of birds such as the magpie, which until the late 16th century was simply called a pie (the mag part comes from the name Margaret. It seems to have been quite common to give birds' names, as in the Robin). The various ingredients in a pie may have suggested the objects randomly collected by the ‘thieving magpie’. The word itself comes from Latin pica ‘magpie’.

    Originally pied (Late Middle English) meant ‘black and white like a magpie’ and referred to the robes of some friars. Now it chiefly refers to birds, such as the pied wagtail. Mammals such as horses are described as piebald (late 16th century), which also means ‘black and white’: the second part is bald in the old sense ‘streaked with white’. The expression pie in the sky, ‘something pleasant to contemplate but very unlikely to be realized’, was originally American and comes from a song written in 1911 by Joe Hill, one of the leaders of an organization called the Industrial Workers of the World (also known as the Wobblies). Along with their union card, each member would receive a songbook containing parodies of popular songs and hymns of the day, with the motto ‘To Fan the Flames of Discontent’ on the cover. The song from which this phrase comes is called ‘The Preacher and the Slave’. It parodies a Salvation Army hymn, ‘In the Sweet Bye and Bye’, which promised those suffering on earth a better life in heaven. In response to the slave asking the preacher for some food, the chorus of the parody goes: ‘Work and pray, live on hay, / You'll get pie in the sky when you die.’

Phrases

(as) —— as pie

1
informal Very ——: using the camera was as easy as pie
More example sentences
  • So many other countries have a system in place already to make it easy as pie to recycle just about anything that can be recycled.
  • You can take someone out and they're nice as pie.
  • One minute she could be sweet as pie, and the next she could be throwing dishes at me.

(as) nice (or sweet) as pie

2
Extremely pleasant or polite: the girl she spoke to was as nice as pie
More example sentences
  • She would act all sweet as pie until the director shouted, ‘Action!’
  • "When I'm off the pitch, I will be as nice as pie. I'll sign autographs, I'll smile, but as soon as I cross the white line, I am there to win the game."
  • She could be as nice as pie in a few days, that's been the pattern recently.

a piece (or slice) of the pie

3
A share of an amount of money or business available to be claimed or distributed: orchestras have seen cultural rivals get a bigger piece of the pie
More example sentences
  • But licensing money is a slice of the pie by which all major leaguers are created essentially equal, with their payments based solely on service time, not on star power.
  • If we sell the house and in 10 years' time somebody gets permission, we might as well get a slice of the pie.
  • With the EU expanding the real concern is that existing farmers will see their supports further eroded as new member states get a slice of the pie.

pie in the sky

4
informal Used to describe or refer to something that is pleasant to contemplate but is very unlikely to be realized: don’t throw away a decent offer in pursuit of pie in the sky
More example sentences
  • It's probably pie in the sky to say we could unionize them, but that's what I'd like to see.
  • And obtaining permission to hold a demonstration, well that's just pie in the sky.
  • I had to convince them that my plans to renovate it weren't just pie in the sky and persuade them that I'd actually finish it.
Synonyms
false hope, illusion, delusion, unrealizable dream, fantasy, pipe dream, daydream, reverie, mirage, castle in the air, castle in Spain

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There are 3 main definitions of pie in English:

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pie2

Line breaks: pie
Pronunciation: /pʌɪ
 
/

noun

Used in names of birds that resemble the magpie, especially in having black-and-white plumage, e.g. tree pie.
Example sentences
  • The present investigation was carried out on oviductal activity during the annual ovarian cycle of the Indian tree pie.
  • Ornithologists will know that the strangely-named Indian Tree Pie takes its name from a colourful Indian member of the crow family (Dendrocitta vagabunda).
  • The Indian Tree Pie is a long-tailed chestnut-brown bird, with sooty head and neck.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, from Latin pica 'magpie' (related to picus 'green woodpecker').

More
  • The pie that is a dish with a pastry crust is the same as the pie in names of birds such as the magpie, which until the late 16th century was simply called a pie (the mag part comes from the name Margaret. It seems to have been quite common to give birds' names, as in the Robin). The various ingredients in a pie may have suggested the objects randomly collected by the ‘thieving magpie’. The word itself comes from Latin pica ‘magpie’.

    Originally pied (Late Middle English) meant ‘black and white like a magpie’ and referred to the robes of some friars. Now it chiefly refers to birds, such as the pied wagtail. Mammals such as horses are described as piebald (late 16th century), which also means ‘black and white’: the second part is bald in the old sense ‘streaked with white’. The expression pie in the sky, ‘something pleasant to contemplate but very unlikely to be realized’, was originally American and comes from a song written in 1911 by Joe Hill, one of the leaders of an organization called the Industrial Workers of the World (also known as the Wobblies). Along with their union card, each member would receive a songbook containing parodies of popular songs and hymns of the day, with the motto ‘To Fan the Flames of Discontent’ on the cover. The song from which this phrase comes is called ‘The Preacher and the Slave’. It parodies a Salvation Army hymn, ‘In the Sweet Bye and Bye’, which promised those suffering on earth a better life in heaven. In response to the slave asking the preacher for some food, the chorus of the parody goes: ‘Work and pray, live on hay, / You'll get pie in the sky when you die.’

Definition of pie in:

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There are 3 main definitions of pie in English:

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pie3

Line breaks: pie
Pronunciation: /pʌɪ
 
/

noun

A former monetary unit of India and Pakistan, equal to one twelfth of an anna.
Example sentences
  • Copper coins were the Pice (of 3 Pies) and the Pie.
  • Towards the nineteenth century, the pie was the smallest minted coin in India.

Origin

from Hindi pā'ī, from Sanskrit pada, padī 'quarter'.

More
  • The pie that is a dish with a pastry crust is the same as the pie in names of birds such as the magpie, which until the late 16th century was simply called a pie (the mag part comes from the name Margaret. It seems to have been quite common to give birds' names, as in the Robin). The various ingredients in a pie may have suggested the objects randomly collected by the ‘thieving magpie’. The word itself comes from Latin pica ‘magpie’.

    Originally pied (Late Middle English) meant ‘black and white like a magpie’ and referred to the robes of some friars. Now it chiefly refers to birds, such as the pied wagtail. Mammals such as horses are described as piebald (late 16th century), which also means ‘black and white’: the second part is bald in the old sense ‘streaked with white’. The expression pie in the sky, ‘something pleasant to contemplate but very unlikely to be realized’, was originally American and comes from a song written in 1911 by Joe Hill, one of the leaders of an organization called the Industrial Workers of the World (also known as the Wobblies). Along with their union card, each member would receive a songbook containing parodies of popular songs and hymns of the day, with the motto ‘To Fan the Flames of Discontent’ on the cover. The song from which this phrase comes is called ‘The Preacher and the Slave’. It parodies a Salvation Army hymn, ‘In the Sweet Bye and Bye’, which promised those suffering on earth a better life in heaven. In response to the slave asking the preacher for some food, the chorus of the parody goes: ‘Work and pray, live on hay, / You'll get pie in the sky when you die.’

Definition of pie in:

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