There are 2 main definitions of plash in English:

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plash1

Line breaks: plash
Pronunciation: /plaʃ
 
/
literary

noun

1A splashing sound: the plash of the fountain
More example sentences
  • It was true sunshine; the true music; the true plash of the fountains from the mouth of stone dolphins.
  • Simply the gentle tones of a flute, the plash of running water and the breathy ululations of the artist's own voice.
  • Certain tribes of the North American Indians have been similarly fascinated by the loud plash of water, to the beauty of which we have alluded before
2A pool or puddle.
Example sentences
  • I ride fast trying to avoid water and deep muddy plashes.
  • Carefully picking his way through the sodden hillocks of grass, rather deep plashes and large stones strewn over the landscape, he soon noticed that his horse had wandered back and was taking an interest in his movements.

verb

[no object] Back to top  
1Make a splashing sound: the oars plashed in the silence
More example sentences
  • In the rainy months, a symphony of leaks puddled her floor, though she never cared, plashing through, with a duck's insouciance.
  • Later there appear to be glass jars tinkling, the soft plashing of paint molecules expelled by industrial sprayguns - perhaps the machine is being coated with a durable finish.
  • Hunger and weariness vanished, and only after the sun was low in the west I plashed on through the swamp, strong and exhilarated as if never more to feel any mortal care.
1.1 [with object] Strike the surface of (water) with a splashing sound: the summer rain, That ... plashed the azure of the river’s flow
More example sentences
  • As he became more awake, his senses became alert to another sound; that of gurgling, plashing water.
  • The gravity of the situation made us look in silence, nothing heard but the plashing of the water against the boat.
  • Chris plashed the water with his hand.

Origin

early 16th century: probably imitative.

More
  • flash from (Middle English):

    We think of flash in terms of fire and light, but in the Middle Ages it originally meant ‘splash water about’, and like plash (early 16th century) and splash (mid 18th century) probably came from the sound of the word. The association with fire may have developed from the resemblance of the word to flame ( see flagrant). The idea of ‘ostentatious stylishness or display of wealth’ goes back to the 17th century. When calling a sudden, brief success a flash in the pan we are referring to early firearms. Sometimes the gunpowder would burn fiercely but ineffectually in the ‘pan’, the part that held the priming charge, without igniting the main charge. The result was a flash and some smoke, but the gun did not fire—what Shakespeare in Macbeth called ‘sound and fury signifying nothing’.

Derivatives

plashy

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • Manga's familiar marks - the ramjet speed lines, the plashy globular peepers, the buckets of gore, - are merely the crumbs of an old and highly developed art form.
  • The plashy fens of the pathogen are a fertile habitat for flat-footed doom-mongers.
  • This work (which was used without acknowledgement by A. Wood) is the source of many well-known anecdotes, such as that of Ralegh laying his cloak for the queen in ‘a plashy place’.

Definition of plash in:

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There are 2 main definitions of plash in English:

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plash2

Line breaks: plash
Pronunciation: /plaʃ
 
/

verb

[with object] archaic
1Bend down and interweave (branches and twigs) to form a hedge.
Example sentences
  • When hawthorn, blackthorn or firethorn were plashed in a hedge, they formed a difficult defensive hedge that acted as an obstacle to an attacking force.
  • Osage orange and some other plants are plashed; that is, the plants are set at an angle rather than perpendicularly, and they are wired together obliquely in such a way that they make an impenetrable barrier just above the surface of the ground.
1.1Make or renew (a hedge) by bending and interweaving branches and twigs.
Example sentences
  • If livestock containment was the priority, this usually meant that the hedge would be laid or plashed every 5 to 10 (or even 20) years, in order to reduce its overall bulk and increase its density.
  • It had been strongly plashed in the past February, and was stiff and stout.

Origin

late 15th century: from Old French plaissier, based on Latin plectere 'to plait'. Compare with pleach.

More
  • flash from (Middle English):

    We think of flash in terms of fire and light, but in the Middle Ages it originally meant ‘splash water about’, and like plash (early 16th century) and splash (mid 18th century) probably came from the sound of the word. The association with fire may have developed from the resemblance of the word to flame ( see flagrant). The idea of ‘ostentatious stylishness or display of wealth’ goes back to the 17th century. When calling a sudden, brief success a flash in the pan we are referring to early firearms. Sometimes the gunpowder would burn fiercely but ineffectually in the ‘pan’, the part that held the priming charge, without igniting the main charge. The result was a flash and some smoke, but the gun did not fire—what Shakespeare in Macbeth called ‘sound and fury signifying nothing’.

Definition of plash in:

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