There are 4 definitions of Pole in English:

Pole

Line breaks: Pole
Pronunciation: /pəʊl
 
/

noun

  • A native or inhabitant of Poland, or a person of Polish descent.
    More example sentences
    • Right-wing renegades - an English-speaker and a Pole, rather than Afrikaners - were responsible.
    • What about the Indians, the Pakistanis, the Italians, the Poles and the English.
    • Our films speak only to 40 million Poles in Poland and a few more millions abroad.

Origin

via German from Polish Polanie, literally 'field-dwellers', from pole 'field'.

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Word of the day skosh
Pronunciation: skōSH
noun
a small amount; a little

There are 4 definitions of Pole in English:

pole1

Line breaks: pole
Pronunciation: /pəʊl
 
/

noun

  • 1A long, slender, rounded piece of wood or metal, typically used with one end placed in the ground as a support for something: a tent pole
    More example sentences
    • But the Transport Research Laboratory has been working on a breakable fence with metal pins between the pole and support.
    • The piece is based on a flock of birds in flight - long white poles support wing-shaped metal triangles in a curved line which echoes the movement of a flock.
    • Another year passes and not so much as a tent pole in the ground.
    Synonyms
    post, pillar, stanchion, standard, paling, pale, stake, stick, picket, palisade, support, prop, batten, mast, bar, shaft, rail, rod, beam, spar, crosspiece, upright, vertical; staff, stave, cane, spike, baton, truncheon
  • 1.1A young tree with a straight slender trunk and no lower branches: new poles should be protected from grazing livestock
    More example sentences
    • The vines were trained up trees and also on trellises on poles of willow.
    • Thicker poles are heavy enough to be freestanding.
  • 1.2 short for ski pole.
    More example sentences
    • Toko will also introduce a cross country ski pole tube to protect poles while in transit.
    • I ski a wide stance with short poles, with a pole always in the snow.
    • Visually impaired skiers follow the sound of the guide's skis and poles on the snow.
  • 1.3A wooden shaft fitted to the front of a cart or carriage drawn by animals and attached to their yokes or collars.
  • 1.4A simple fishing rod: they tell you on the tin that their tuna is entirely caught with pole and line
    More example sentences
    • There is, however, a Byzantium illustration depicting what appears to be a fishing rod or pole.
    • Then, lift the pole so the hook and the bulk shot is clear of the water.
    • Year-round you'll find young fishing enthusiasts as well as elderly fishermen relaxing on the wooden pier with their poles and bait.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
  • Propel (a boat) by pushing a pole against the bottom of a river, canal, or lake: the boatman appeared, poling a small gondola [no object]: they poled slowly across to the other bank
    More example sentences
    • If, for example, after grounding the operator tries to power off instead of calling for assistance or poling the boat to deeper water, it will create a ‘blow hole’ in the grass bed about the size of the hull.
    • Parvat stopped poling the boat and thought for a moment.
    • Kartik and Sanyas take turns poling the boat, the pole dramatic against the sky.

Phrases

under bare poles

Sailing With no sail set: if it really blows you’ll end up under bare poles
More example sentences
  • Even under bare poles a sailboat will heel right over, at least to decks awash, in hurricane force conditions.
  • It's powering under bare poles on a day which is ideal for all sail aloft and, unless I've forgotten what she looks like, that's surely Crusty Lady Lily heading for the Gap.
  • Sails were down and it was running under bare poles before the wind.

up the pole

informal
  • 2chiefly Irish Pregnant: young Sharon’s after getting herself up the pole
    More example sentences
    • She said I had shamed them enough without flying in the face of God trying to crack on I was a virgin when everyone on the street knew I was up the pole.

Origin

late Old English pāl (in early use without reference to thickness or length), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch paal and German Pfahl, based on Latin palus 'stake'.

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Definition of pole in:

There are 4 definitions of Pole in English:

pole2

Line breaks: pole
Pronunciation: /pəʊl
 
/

noun

  • 1Either of the two locations ( North Pole or South Pole) on the surface of the earth (or of a celestial object) which are the northern and southern ends of the axis of rotation. See also magnetic pole.
    More example sentences
    • The logic of the correction was to visualise a human form straddling the celestial North Pole and orientated with his feet toward the ground.
    • Moreover, depending on the station's location relative to the pole and the season, it could be subject to extended periods of darkness.
    • In the polar world, there are three classic expeditions, the North Pole, the South Pole and the Greenland Ice Cap.
  • 1.1 Geometry Either of the two points at which the axis of a circle cuts the surface of a sphere.
    More example sentences
    • Like the lines of longitude on Earth, each great circle eventually intersects with every other great circle at the poles of the sphere.
    • Ibrahim proves in this work that the stereographic projection maps circles which do not pass through the pole of projection onto circles.
    • You could try simply pushing the poles of a sphere toward each other, as if to make them pass through each other and change places.
  • 1.2 Geometry A fixed point to which other points or lines are referred, e.g. the origin of polar coordinates or the point of which a line or curve is a polar.
    More example sentences
    • Sturm's theoretical work in mathematical physics involved the study of caustic curves, and poles and polars of conic sections.
    • His development of the pole and polar lines associated with conics led to the principle of duality.
    • Hence, we can produce poles, polars, points, geodesics, angles, and so forth readily by converting back to the Poincare model.
  • 1.3 Biology An extremity of the main axis of a cell, organ, or part.
    More example sentences
    • The PAS-protein stain revealed that the cells at the shoot pole have a dense cytoplasm.
    • Kinetochore microtubule bundles link sister chromosomes to the poles.
    • The cytoplasm at the posterior pole is distinguished by large organelles, the polar granules, which contain both proteins and RNAs.
  • 1.4Each of the two opposite points on the surface of a magnet at which magnetic forces are strongest.
    More example sentences
    • Physically, they were like the opposite poles of a magnet.
    • This attraction is similar to that of two opposite poles of a magnet.
    • Accountability to the Treasury is the opposite pole of the magnet to entrepreneurial spirit.
  • 1.5Each of two terminals (positive and negative) of an electric cell, battery, or machine.
    More example sentences
    • Water molecules have poles of positive and negative electric charge that are known to create attractive forces between cells, known as van der Waals forces.
  • 1.6One of two opposed or contradictory principles or ideas: Miriam and Rebecca represent two poles in the argument about transracial adoption
    More example sentences
    • Two recent front page stories in this newspaper represent the poles of opinion on crime and punishment.
    • After the fiery blast of energy that revitalized popular music-making, artists moved to the opposite pole.
    • This zero-degree photography embodied the opposite pole of the daguerreotype's infinite clarity.
    Synonyms
    extremity, extreme, limit
    rare antipode

Phrases

be poles apart

Have nothing in common: the two sisters had ceased to communicate with each other—their ideas were now poles apart
More example sentences
  • Given that politically, we are poles apart, there is quite a lot of common ground.
  • In its emphasis on self-knowledge gained through the study of poetry and heroes, Emerson's idea of self-reliance is poles apart from the modern notion of self-esteem.
  • If you've never watched it live before, do it at some point in your life - it'll make you realise why this country and the US will always be poles apart, but why we're all bred to have a soft spot for Hollywood in the first place.
Synonyms
completely different, as different as they could be, widely separated, directly opposed, antithetical, incompatible, irreconcilable, miles/worlds apart, at opposite extremes/poles, like night and day; British like chalk and cheese
rare antipodal

Derivatives

poleward

adjective
More example sentences
  • High mountain ranges, especially those with a large north - south frontage, act as barriers to east - west circulation and force the atmospheric circulation into poleward diversions.
  • But in the short-term, poleward range expansions of temperate-zone species will provide the major mechanism by which boreal and arctic diversity might increase.
  • The relatively constant speed of a chromosome during poleward and antipoleward motion is difficult to explain from the behavior of conventional ATP-dependent motor proteins.

polewards

adjective & adverb

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin polus 'end of an axis', from Greek polos 'pivot, axis, sky'.

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Definition of pole in:

There are 4 definitions of Pole in English:

pole3

Line breaks: pole
Pronunciation: /pəʊl
 
/

noun

  • short for pole position.
    More example sentences
    • Hearn, who like Schmidt resides in Henderson, Nev., has a victory and two poles in the IndyCar Series.
    • But now to come here and drive for a team that is as big as it is with the Rahal-Letterman and to get not only their first pole for them at Homestead, it was my first pole, and now it's all of our first poles here again at Indy.
    • He started from the pole and captured the checkered flag driving a truck for Richard Childress.

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