There are 3 definitions of pound in English:

pound1

Line breaks: pound
Pronunciation: /paʊnd
 
/

noun

  • 1 (abbreviation: lb) A unit of weight equal to 16 oz. avoirdupois (0.4536 kg), or 12 oz. troy (0.3732 kg).
    More example sentences
    • A short ton is the standard U.S. ton of 2,000 pounds and measures weight.
    • Birth weight was recorded in pounds and ounces and converted into kilograms.
    • Thus, using this value is a bit like rounding off your own weight to the nearest hundred pounds.
  • 2 (also pound sterling) (plural pounds sterling) The basic monetary unit of the UK, equal to 100 pence.
    More example sentences
    • The only exceptions to this convention are quotes in relation to the euro, the pound sterling and the Australian dollar - these three are quoted as dollars per foreign currency.
    • The data will be required to be submitted on a quarterly basis and will be in the five major currencies of the world, viz., the US dollar, the yen, the Deutsche mark, the pound sterling, and the euro.
    • For instance, a major reason for the damaging appreciations of the dollar and the pound sterling in the 1980s was tight monetary policy in the United States and United Kingdom respectively.
    Synonyms
    pound sterling, £
    British informal quid, smacker, smackeroo, nicker, oner, oncer
    British historical sovereign
  • 2.1 another term for punt4.
  • 2.2The basic monetary unit of several Middle Eastern countries, equal to 100 piastres.
    More example sentences
    • He said coalition forces on the ground recovered numerous weapons, 2m Iraqi dinars and Syrian pounds, foreign passports and a satcom radio.
    • More than seven million Egyptian pounds have been spent on updating it to prepare for privatisation.
  • 2.3The former basic monetary unit of Cyprus, equal to 100 cents.
  • 2.4The basic monetary unit of Sudan.
    More example sentences
    • The north, he said, would continue with the dinar and south Sudan would adopt the new Sudan pound.

Phrases

a pound to a penny

British informal
Used to emphasize one’s certainty about something: simply think of your budget and a pound to a penny we’ll have the car to suit it
More example sentences
  • But a pound to a penny in old money, Fermanagh will come out on Saturday confident of polishing off Mayo and moving on to the All-Ireland final for the first time in their history.
  • I will lay a pound to a penny that if he does reintroduce fees the money will be used not to beat educational disadvantage, but either to pay public service wages or to reduce total state spending.
  • I'd lay a pound to a penny that the first time Woking council invoke their new powers it will not be to defeat a cunning plot by international terrorists...but in a dispute over hedges or car parking.

one's pound of flesh

Something one is strictly or legally entitled to, but which it is ruthless or inhuman to demand.
[with allusion to Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice]
More example sentences
  • If the city councillors decide to go ahead with demanding their pound of flesh, perhaps the central government could compensate by offering to honour its moral obligation by paying the rent on behalf of the embassies.
  • But he will still demand his monthly pound of flesh.
  • ‘The coalition partners will demand their pound of flesh when it comes to getting the best portfolios,’ said one observer.

Origin

Old English pund, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch pond and German Pfund, from Latin (libra) pondo, denoting a Roman ‘pound weight’ of 12 ounces.

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Word of the day kerf
Pronunciation: kərf
noun
a slit made by cutting with a saw

There are 3 definitions of pound in English:

pound2

Line breaks: pound
Pronunciation: /paʊnd
 
/

verb

[with object]
  • 2Crush or grind (something) into a powder or paste: pound the cloves with salt and pepper until smooth
    More example sentences
    • They may have been part of a pre-Christian religious ritual or they may have been communal property in which corn or oats was pounded or ground.
    • Writing, which ought to nurture and give shape to thought, is instead being used to pound it into a powder and then reconstitute it into gruel.
    • Slowly add olive oil to loosen the paste as you pound it then add the rest of the cheese.
    Synonyms
    crush, grind, pulverize, beat, mill, pestle, mash, pulp, bruise, powder, granulate
    technical triturate, comminute
    archaic bray, levigate
    rare kibble
  • 2.1 informal Defeat (an opponent) in a resounding way: [with object and complement]: he pounded the unseeded American 6-2 7-5 7-5
    More example sentences
    • But in April last year, he pounded him to defeat, knocking him out in the seventh round of a one-sided contest.
    • He pounded him to defeat inside three rounds.
    • After 40 pitches he tires, or opponents adjust and pound him.

Phrases

pound the beat

(Of a police officer) patrol an allocated route or area.
More example sentences
  • He also called for an increase in police pounding the beat in the area, saying: ‘I think that local people want to see visible policing, with a higher profile.’
  • Four police officers were pounding the beat in a different part of London on Saturday as they zipped round the marathon course to raise over £3,000 for charity.
  • Paramedics are on call and police officers are pounding the beat.

Phrasal verbs

pound something out

Produce a text or piece of music with heavy strokes on a keyboard or instrument: an old typewriter on which she pounded out her poems
More example sentences
  • They are standing by the story, saying it's possible the documents were pounded out on a typewriter.
  • Written by a former Marine Corporal in 1987 when stationed in Washington D.C., it was pounded out on a typewriter while awaiting the commanding officer's Christmas holiday decoration inspection.

Origin

Old English pūnian; related to Dutch puin, Low German pün '(building) rubbish'.

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Definition of pound in:

There are 3 definitions of pound in English:

pound3

Line breaks: pound
Pronunciation: /paʊnd
 
/

noun

  • 1A place where stray animals, especially dogs, may be officially taken and kept until claimed by their owners.
    More example sentences
    • Aided by a donkey sanctuary welfare officer, he followed a trail that led him to animal pounds and fields in remote areas in the black of night.
    • It is the animal pound's word against the neighbor's, and although I am guilty of not following the by-law, I hardly think that I deserve the heartache this has caused me.
    • I couldn't put other people's animals in the pound.
    Synonyms
    enclosure, compound, pen, yard; British greenyard
    historical pinfold
  • 1.1A place where illegally parked motor vehicles removed by the police are kept until their owners pay a fine in order to reclaim them.
    More example sentences
    • At 1930 he and many other vehicles that had been stopped were escorted by police to the pound in East London, where our bakkie was impounded.
  • 1.2 archaic A place of confinement; a trap or prison.

verb

[with object] archaic Back to top  
  • Shut (an animal) in a pound.

Origin

late Middle English (earlier in compounds): of uncertain origin. Early use referred to an enclosure for the detention of stray or trespassing cattle.

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