There are 2 main definitions of prom in English:

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prom 1

Line breaks: prom

noun

informal
1British short for promenade (sense 1 of the noun). she took a short cut along the prom
More example sentences
  • Last time I was there the tide was in, so the best we could do was walk along the prom, making clucking noises at the jet-skiers disrupting the peace.
  • So, today, as I walked along the prom, I resolved to buy Ulysses.
  • We walked along the prom to the part of the beach where Edward was allowed to run about on the sands.
2 (also Prom) British short for promenade concert. the last night of the Proms
More example sentences
  • His career highlights include a concerto appearance at the RTE proms and his debut CD of works by Schumann and Schubert.
  • If I'd remembered, I'd have tuned into the first night of the proms instead.
  • Is it just me, or did I see the entire population of Henman Hill at the last night of the proms?
3chiefly North American A formal dance, especially one held by a class in high school or college at the end of a year: he asked me to the school prom but I turned him down [as modifier]: a prom queen
More example sentences
  • The prom is a formal dance, usually sponsored by a high school or a college.
  • They burst in and thought it was a high school prom party.
  • Yes, they had danced before at their proms, but he had done nothing like this.

Words that rhyme with prom

aplomb, bomb, bombe, CD-ROM, dom, from, glom, mom, pom, Rom, shalom, Somme, therefrom, Thom, tom, wherefrom

Definition of prom in:

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There are 2 main definitions of prom in English:

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PROM 2 Syllabification: PROM

Entry from US English dictionary

noun

Computing
A memory chip that can be programmed only once by the manufacturer or user.

Origin

From p(rogrammable) r(ead-)o(nly) m(emory).

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