Definition of propel in English:

propel

Line breaks: pro¦pel
Pronunciation: /prəˈpɛl
 
/

verb (propels, propelling, propelled)

[with object]
  • 1Drive or push something forwards: the boat is propelled by using a very long paddle (as adjective, in combination -propelled) a rocket-propelled grenade launcher
    More example sentences
    • But he found he could propel himself forward by pushing off against the sides with his feet.
    • The propeller or the jet engine of an aircraft pushes air backwards to propel the aircraft forward.
    • And you'll get the added boost of an extra body propelling the boat forward.
    Synonyms
    push/move forwards, move, set in motion, get moving, drivethrow, thrust, toss, fling, hurl, lob, let fly, launch, pitch, project, send, shoot
    informal chuck, sling, bung
  • 1.1 [with object and adverbial of direction] Spur or drive into a particular situation: fear propelled her out of her stillness
    More example sentences
    • These were ordinary people who were propelled into an extraordinary situation.
    • Do not let fear of error or retribution propel you into a medical appointment or a dangerous situation.
    • He established himself as the champion of the working people and that helped propel him to the presidency.
    Synonyms
    spur, drive, prompt, precipitate, catapult, motivate, force, impel

Origin

late Middle English (in the sense 'expel, drive out'): from Latin propellere, from pro- 'forward' + pellere 'to drive'.

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