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propound

Line breaks: pro|pound
Pronunciation: /prəˈpaʊnd
 
/

Definition of propound in English:

verb

[with object]
Put forward (an idea or theory) for consideration by others: he began to propound the idea of a ‘social monarchy’ as an alternative to Franco
More example sentences
  • He's written several popular books propounding his theories.
  • And for three or four years they have sat and listened to lecturers propounding these half-baked ideas.
  • In the middle of nineteenth century Karl Marx propounded the theory of historical and dialectical materialism.
Synonyms

Origin

mid 16th century: alteration of archaic propone, from Latin proponere 'set forth', from pro- 'forward' + ponere 'put'. The addition of the final -d can be compared with that in expound and compound.

Derivatives

propounder

1
noun
Example sentences
  • The propounders of this theory, many of them youngish politicians, probably didn't intend it to apply to politics but, with oldies increasingly significant as a proportion of eligible voters, it may come to do so.
  • The propounders of reformist theory have a solid argument.
  • In that case the propounder of the Will made by a wealthy 74 year old man was a person who was alleged to have killed the deceased unlawfully.

Definition of propound in:

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