Definition of prude in English:

prude

Line breaks: prude
Pronunciation: /pruːd
 
/

noun

A person who is or claims to be easily shocked by matters relating to sex or nudity: the sex was so ambiguous and romantic that none but a prude could find it objectionable
More example sentences
  • Ms Sheppard said: ‘People tend to think of the Victorians as prudes but this dress is quite revealing.’
  • He was neither a prude nor a Puritan, but he was scornful of self-indulgence, and though he earned a reputation as the champion of the poor, it was only of the deserving and never of the idle.
  • Leland Ryken in his book on the Puritans, Worldly Saints, has shown by extensive quotes that the Puritans were anything but prudes about sex.
Synonyms
puritan, prig, killjoy, moral zealot/fanatic, moralist, Mrs Grundy, Grundy, old maid, schoolmarm, pietist, Victorian, priggish person;
North American bluenose
informal goody-goody, Goody Two-Shoes, holy Joe, holy Willie, Miss Prim

Origin

early 18th century: from French, back-formation from prudefemme, feminine of prud'homme 'good man and true', from prou 'worthy'.

Derivatives

prudery

noun
More example sentences
  • Victorian prudery did the rest, followed in quick succession by an unhealthy determination to class sexual congress as obscene and therefore not to be discussed, far less celebrated.
  • It is also where the prudery of a later time has obviously crept in; the sculptures all seem lack-lustre and no sexual connotations are to be found here.
  • I grew up in those supposedly halcyon days before World War II, and what I mainly remember was the repressive prudery in all matters sexual.

Definition of prude in:

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Pronunciation: dəˈmôrəˌlīz
verb
cause (someone) to lose confidence or hope; dispirit