Definition of pulp in English:

pulp

Line breaks: pulp
Pronunciation: /pʌlp
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
1A soft, wet, shapeless mass of material: boiling with soda will reduce your peas to pulp
More example sentences
  • The shipyards were doubtless full of men who could dismantle the defences of a huge audience in 30 seconds and then reduce them to one massed pulp of laughter for two-and-a-half hours.
  • There were fine scallops too, nicely sautéed, sitting on an earthy pea pulp, anointed with a minty butter sauce.
  • Open out the body into a flat piece and scrape away the soft interior pulp.
Synonyms
mash, mush, purée, cream, pressé, pap, slop, paste, slush, mulch, swill, slurry, semi-liquid, semi-fluid, mess; baby food
informal gloop, goo, gook
North American informal glop
technical triturate
rare pomace
1.1The soft fleshy part of a fruit.
More example sentences
  • Jane suspends the pips in muslin to help the marmalade set, but I just use the juice and fleshy pulp from the inside of a lemon… it does the same trick.
  • Getting any sort of fleshy pulp was very difficult, so I squeezed the fruits to get decent amounts of liquid.
  • Wet waste connotes anything generated from the kitchen - vegetable and fruit peels, pulp, left-over food matter.
Synonyms
flesh, soft part, fleshy part, marrow, meat
1.2A soft wet mass of fibres derived from rags or wood, used in papermaking.
More example sentences
  • They are used for the first chemical processing step of converting wood chips into pulp for paper manufacturing, primarily in the sulphate or kraft paper process.
  • These products may also contain rayon and wood fluff, which is chemically derived from tree pulp and then bleached.
  • The most important reasons for this are strong commodity prices, particularly for copper, pulp, paper and wood products.
1.3Vascular tissue filling the interior cavity and root canals of a tooth.
More example sentences
  • Human teeth are made up of four different types of tissue: pulp, dentin, enamel, and cementum.
  • A loose or broken filling may also cause infection in the tooth pulp.
  • In the middle of every tooth, there is space containing dental pulp.
1.4 Mining Pulverized ore mixed with water.
More example sentences
  • A device for borehole hydraulic mining includes a pipeline for delivering fluid into the hole accommodated inside a pipeline for bringing pulp to the surface.
2 [usually as modifier] Popular or sensational writing that is regarded as being of poor quality: the story is a mix of pulp fiction and Greek tragedy
[because formerly printed on cheap paper]
More example sentences
  • Popular pulp fiction and radio sow the seeds of resistance to social injustice.
  • It's a fast-paced pulp science fiction yarn with compelling characters.
  • It was a fitting end to a game that had more twists and turns than a pulp fiction thriller.
Synonyms
trashy, rubbishy, cheap, sensational, lurid, tasteless, kitschy
informal tacky

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Crush into a soft, wet, shapeless mass: bales of waste paper were chopped, shredded, and pulped
More example sentences
  • Faking Cleopatra's suicide would have been as easy as pulping a fig.
  • New technologies for pulping fast-growth trees figured prominently.
  • Picking bakeapples and pulping them into the most delicious jam on the face of the planet.
Synonyms
mash, purée, cream, crush, press, smash, liquidize, liquefy, sieve, shred, squash, pound, beat, macerate, mill, grind, mince, soften, mangle
technical comminute, triturate
archaic levigate, bray, powderize
1.1Withdraw (a publication) from the market and recycle the paper: the publisher had the right to pulp all unsold copies
More example sentences
  • But supporters need not panic, nor the View's editors rush to pulp this week's issue.
  • The key to writing a bi-weekly column throughout the summer is to write a column a week in advance of its appearing on the news stand that will still be relevant three weeks later when the issue is finally pulped.
  • The cards and envelopes are pulped and recycled to make new products.

Origin

late Middle English (denoting the soft fleshy part of fruit): from Latin pulpa. The verb dates from the mid 17th century.

Phrases

beat (or smash) someone to a pulp

Beat someone severely.
More example sentences
  • You didn't get to see any of that because we were beaten to a pulp.
  • The lad on the floor looked like he had been beaten to a pulp.
  • What kind of society do we have when our sons and daughters, our grandchildren, our brothers and sisters cannot travel home at night without a gang of aggressive drunks beating them to a pulp, just for the hell of it?

Derivatives

pulper

noun
More example sentences
  • The cherry berries are ‘floated’ first of all; light, substandard beans are raked off and the good beans are then sluiced gradually down to the pulpers.
  • The Powley Vale Farm was a throwback to by-gone days, free range hens and pulper, open fire and hob, live sowing of spuds and corn sowing with a fiddle out of tune.
  • The old on-the-farm Japanese production techniques began to be revitalized, and homesteaders hooked up lawn mower engines to old hand pulpers to mill their coffee cherry.

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