There are 2 main definitions of quit in English:

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quit1

Line breaks: quit
Pronunciation: /kwɪt
 
/

verb (quits, quitting; past and past participle quitted or quit)

1 [with object] Leave (a place), usually permanently: hippies finally quit two sites in Hampshire last night
More example sentences
  • The villagers told them to quit the place immediately.
  • Abdul barks orders, and they quit base camp hastily.
  • In a half an hour, I quit this place, slip into the ocean, and hassle the local aquatic life with my snorkel and my submersible camera.
Synonyms
leave, go away from, depart from, vacate, evacuate, move out of, exit from, withdraw from, abandon, desert
1.1 [no object] (Of a tenant) leave rented accommodation: the landlord issued a notice to quit
More example sentences
  • The next day tenants received notices to quit from an agent they believed represented the owner.
  • The council has decided to serve notice to quit on the 46 council house tenants on Toppings Estate who have refused to accept a rent increase.
  • But the landowner has given a statutory notice to quit - ending a 20 year lease with the former landowner.
1.2 informal Resign from (a job): she quit her job in a pizza restaurant [no object]: he quit as manager of the struggling Third Division team
More example sentences
  • Only four out of 1,000 employees who quit jobs last year retired due to their age, according to the Ministry of Labor.
  • At 24, I had quit my job, packed up everything I owned into the back of my Volkswagen, and moved 1000 miles away for no good reason.
  • That same week she found an apartment in Erie, quit her job, packed her things and moved to Pennsylvania.
Synonyms
resign (from), leave, hand in one's notice, give notice, stand down (from), give up, bow out, relinquish, depart from, vacate, walk out (on), retire (from), abdicate
informal chuck, pack in
1.3 informal , chiefly North American Stop or discontinue (an action or activity): quit moaning! I want to quit smoking
More example sentences
  • In order to care for the patient, most families had to quit other activities.
  • I hate having to quit a project, leaving it unfinished.
  • Why do you quit your routine when you begin to make progress?
Synonyms
2 (quit oneself) [with adverbial] archaic Behave in a specified way: quit yourselves like men, and fight

adjective

(quit of) Back to top  
Rid of: I want to be quit of him

Origin

Middle English (in the sense 'set free'): from Old French quiter (verb), quite (adjective), from Latin quietus, past participle of quiescere 'be still', from quies 'quiet'.

More
  • An Old French word from the same root as quiet, Latin quietus ‘quiet, still, resting’. The first meanings of quit were ‘to pay off a debt’, ‘to repay a service or favour’, and ‘to set free’. It also meant ‘to declare a person not guilty’, a meaning for which we would now use the related word acquit. The modern meanings, ‘to leave, go away’, and ‘to stop doing something’, are from the 17th century. To call it quits is to agree that terms are now equal, especially in the settlement of a debt, or to decide to abandon what you are doing in order to cut your losses. It dates back only to the 1890s and is a fairly informal expression, but an earlier version, cry quits, is recorded from the 1630s and comes from the world of officialdom. Church records of accounts from the late 15th century use the word quits to indicate that money owing to someone has been paid in full. Church business was usually conducted in Latin, and so quits probably arose from a scribe's shortening of the medieval Latin word quittus, meaning ‘discharged’, written on receipts to indicate that the goods had been paid for. Quite, found from the Middle Ages in the sense ‘completely, fully’ is probably from quit. The sense ‘fairly’ does not develop until the 19th century.

Phrases

quit hold of

1
archaic Let go of.

Definition of quit in:

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There are 2 main definitions of quit in English:

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quit2

Line breaks: quit
Pronunciation: /kwɪt
 
/

noun

[in combination]
Used in names of various small songbirds found in the Caribbean area, e.g. bananaquit, grassquit.
Example sentences
  • Each time the Grassquit sings, it jumps straight into the air and opens its wings to reveal white patches.
  • The Grassquit resides in small flocks and likes to use empty bananaquit nests for roosting at night.

Origin

mid 19th century: probably imitative.

More
  • An Old French word from the same root as quiet, Latin quietus ‘quiet, still, resting’. The first meanings of quit were ‘to pay off a debt’, ‘to repay a service or favour’, and ‘to set free’. It also meant ‘to declare a person not guilty’, a meaning for which we would now use the related word acquit. The modern meanings, ‘to leave, go away’, and ‘to stop doing something’, are from the 17th century. To call it quits is to agree that terms are now equal, especially in the settlement of a debt, or to decide to abandon what you are doing in order to cut your losses. It dates back only to the 1890s and is a fairly informal expression, but an earlier version, cry quits, is recorded from the 1630s and comes from the world of officialdom. Church records of accounts from the late 15th century use the word quits to indicate that money owing to someone has been paid in full. Church business was usually conducted in Latin, and so quits probably arose from a scribe's shortening of the medieval Latin word quittus, meaning ‘discharged’, written on receipts to indicate that the goods had been paid for. Quite, found from the Middle Ages in the sense ‘completely, fully’ is probably from quit. The sense ‘fairly’ does not develop until the 19th century.

Definition of quit in:

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