Definition of recant in English:

recant

Line breaks: re¦cant
Pronunciation: /rɪˈkant
 
/

verb

[no object]
Say that one no longer holds an opinion or belief, especially one considered heretical: heretics were burned if they would not recant [with object]: Galileo was forced to recant his assertion that the earth orbited the sun
More example sentences
  • It reminds me a little bit of the Welsh side of my family who a generation back refused to learn Welsh or take Welsh culture seriously, and are now recanting.
  • But not one of Jesus's early disciples who believed that they had met Jesus after the resurrection ever recanted.
  • He initially backed them up but later recanted, telling prosecutors there was no agreement.
Synonyms
renounce, forswear, disavow, deny, repudiate, renege on, abjure, relinquish, abandon
archaic forsake
change one's mind, be apostate, defect, renege
retract, take back, withdraw, disclaim, disown, recall, unsay

Origin

mid 16th century: from Latin recantare 'revoke', from re- (expressing reversal) + cantare 'sing, chant'.

Derivatives

recanter

noun
More example sentences
  • That, of course, brings the number of recanters to three.
  • Such recanters often retained a substantial element of Anabaptist thought and ethic.
  • As for the recanters who have accused someone of sexual abuse and then said it wasn't true - each case must be evaluated separately and independently.

Definition of recant in:

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