Definition of rector in English:

rector

Line breaks: rec¦tor
Pronunciation: /ˈrɛktə
 
/

noun

1(In the Church of England) the incumbent of a parish where all tithes formerly passed to the incumbent. Compare with vicar.
More example sentences
  • The farmers now decided that they should also get some relief in their Tithe payments and deputations went to the rectors in the parish.
  • Tickets are available from the rector, church wardens and the parish office.
  • The eldest son is the rector of four conjoined parishes nearby.
1.1(In other Anglican Churches) a member of the clergy who has charge of a parish.
More example sentences
  • ‘The font was used to baptise Dr Kathleen Lynn; her father was the Anglican rector of the parish in 1874,’ pointed out a local.
  • According to the bishop of London the Anglican rector of South Hackney helped create the shrines, which were visited by the Queen in 1917.
  • The Reverend William Matheus, another member, was assistant rector at St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, a bulwark of progressive social causes.
1.2(In the Roman Catholic Church) a priest in charge of a church or of a religious institution.
More example sentences
  • When the site is fully restored, the local rector Rev Lynda Peilow and the Roman Catholic priest Fr Gerard O'Byrne will hold a ceremony and remaining family members of those buried there will be invited to attend.
2The head of certain universities, colleges, and schools.
More example sentences
  • The responsibilities of university rectors and senior administrators are not clearly defined.
  • A former rector of the college, he said: ‘At the moment, we do not feel under threat from that direction.’
  • The university rector was appointed for four years by the minister of education and was subordinate to the curator of his educational district.
2.1(In Scotland) an elected representative of students on a university’s governing body.
More example sentences
  • Both have been nominated by students as potential rectors of St Andrews University in Scotland.
  • The rector is the senior representative for the university's 17,000 students and chairs the University Court, which is the governing body for the whole university.
  • Brown, with his trademark long hair and tweed jackets, had undertaken a well organised campaign to be elected rector, a post unique to Scottish universities.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin rector 'ruler', from rect- 'ruled', from the verb regere.

Derivatives

rectorate

noun
More example sentences
  • The dispute came to a head when both the rectorate and the foundation placed separate advertisements stating differing versions of the requirements for student applicants.

rectorial

Pronunciation: /-ˈtɔːrɪəl/
adjective
More example sentences
  • A rectorial election is a peculiarly Scottish institution.
  • The protagonists of the story were real students of the time, and the cause of their dispute - a heated argument between the rival camps during a rectorial election - is all too plausible.
  • The perceived wisdom is that the Young Toffs supported Neil's rectorial campaign.

rectorship

noun
More example sentences
  • Two people remain in the running for the rectorship of the University of Indonesia after its board of trustees dropped two candidates during a vote on Monday.
  • Another kind of glory was the opening, during Morgan's rectorship, of The Free Chapel at Prince and Thompson Streets to serve the poor.
  • As well as the rectorship, Ruffini held a chair of applied mathematics, a chair of practical medicine and a chair of clinical medicine in the University of Modena.

Definition of rector in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day animalcule
Pronunciation: ˌanəˈmalˌkyo͞ol
noun
a microscopic animal