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regime

Line breaks: re¦gime
Pronunciation: /reɪˈʒiːm
 
/

Definition of regime in English:

noun

1A government, especially an authoritarian one: ideological opponents of the regime
More example sentences
  • For one, wages tend to be lower in authoritarian regimes than in democracies, giving businesses in dictatorships a monetary advantage in selling exports abroad.
  • Meanwhile, in southern Europe, Spain, Portugal, and Greece were ruled by authoritarian regimes.
  • This sort of empty democratic trapping is a hallmark of authoritarian regimes.
Synonyms
2A system or ordered way of doing things: detention centres with a very tough physical regime a tax regime
More example sentences
  • Of course, economists apply additional tests to tax regimes.
  • ‘We have requested Burgoynes to focus on the Assured's cleaning regimes in order to ensure that compliance has occurred’.
  • It would in effect change the regime from a reference system to an appellate one.
Synonyms
system, arrangement, scheme, code;
apparatus, mechanism;
order, pattern, method, procedure, routine, policy, practice, course, plan, programme;
diet, regimen
2.1A coordinated programme for the promotion or restoration of health; a regimen: a low-calorie, low-fat regime
More example sentences
  • Bladder instillation therapy regimes are described in Table 1.
  • Thus, all patients get all drugs, making medical regimes complex and costly.
  • She has a chart for a typical patient's eight-week therapy on various regimes.
2.2The conditions under which a scientific or industrial process occurs.
Example sentences
  • However, there are regimes in which a process similar to stochastic resonance operates and amplifies pattern selectivity.
  • Peds are blocky structures formed in soils as a result of wetting and drying processes under seasonal climate regimes.
  • However, their concentration is governed by the hydrological regime of the river systems.

Origin

late 15th century (in the sense 'regimen'): French régime, from Latin regimen 'rule' (see regimen). Sense 1 dates from the late 18th century (with original reference to the Ancien Régime).

More
  • regency from (Late Middle English):

    Between 1811 and 1820 George, Prince of Wales was regent (Late Middle English) for his father King George III, who was suffering from a long-term mental illness. The prince was known for his fun-loving lifestyle and support for the arts, and the period of the Regency was noted for its distinctive fashions and architecture—such as, for example, the wildly exotic Brighton Pavilion designed by John Nash. The balls and parties held by the aristocracy of the time are imagined in the romantic historical novels set in this period and called Regency romances. The source of regency is Latin regere ‘to govern, rule’, which means it is related to words like regal (Late Middle English) ‘like a ruler’; rector (Late Middle English) ‘governor’( see vicar); regime (Late Middle English) ‘rule or regulation’; regiment (Late Middle English) which originally had the same sense as regime; region (Middle English) an area governed; regular (Late Middle English) originally ‘governed by a rule’; royal; and rule.

Definition of regime in:

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Pronunciation: ˈemyələs
adjective
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