Definition of replete in English:

replete

Line breaks: re|plete
Pronunciation: /rɪˈpliːt
 
/

adjective

[predicative]
1Filled or well-supplied with something: sensational popular fiction, replete with adultery and sudden death
More example sentences
  • The combination of the flood of people hitting the pit, and the absence of a barrier, resulted in an insane dance floor, replete with gratuitous crowd surfing and lost brain cells aplenty.
  • Zelenka's music is always very pleasant and one must take particular notice of his exquisite ‘Salve Regina’, a truly exquisite work that is brimful and replete with melodies and fugal counterpoint.
  • What's documented here is that personal warfare, replete with bursting explosions and a splattering of machine-gun notes.
Synonyms
1.1Very full of or sated by food: I went out into the sun-drenched streets again, replete and relaxed
More example sentences
  • The full effects of public repleteness are not yet known, but new studies show that it can lead not only to sort-of sleepiness and lethargy but also to slight nausea and, in a majority of subjects, not being able to eat another thing.
Synonyms
well fed, sated, satiated, full, full up, full to bursting, satisfied; glutted, gorged
informal stuffed
archaic satiate, surfeited

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French replet(e) or Latin repletus 'filled up', past participle of replere, from re- 'back, again' + plere 'fill'.

Derivatives

repletion

noun
More example sentences
  • That's a feminine accomplishment: a feat of memory, a managed repletion or resplendence.
  • He harvested the punters at book-signing time, with a look of airy repletion.
  • With progressively more disease states manifesting GSH deficiency, repletion is a viable preventive, therapeutic, and anti-aging strategy.

Definition of replete in:

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Word of the day flippant
Pronunciation: ˈflipənt
adjective
not showing a serious or respectful attitude