Definition of report in English:

report

Line breaks: re¦port
Pronunciation: /rɪˈpɔːt
 
/

verb

1 [reporting verb] Give a spoken or written account of something that one has observed, heard, done, or investigated: [with object]: the minister reported a decline in milk production [with clause]: police reported that the floods were abating [no object]: the teacher should report on the child’s progress
More example sentences
  • The spectator observes a certain space and has the capacity to report on what their eyes see.
  • NKA was founded in 1994 to report on activities of contemporary African art and to train young African writers.
  • Parker will report on what's in the bottle, courageously unconcerned by the reputation on the label or by the affability of the wine-maker.
Synonyms
announce, describe, give an account of, tell of, detail, delineate, outline; communicate, pass on, relay; divulge, disclose, reveal; make public, publish, circulate, set out, set forth, put out, post, broadcast; blazon, herald, proclaim, declare, publicize, promulgate; document, record, chronicle
formal adumbrate
1.1 [no object] Cover an event or subject as a journalist or a reporter: the press reported on Republican sex scandals [with clause]: the Egyptian news agency reported that a coup attempt had taken place
More example sentences
  • Coverage such as the Time article illustrates reflexivity because it not only reported on the event, but it drew attention to the production of the event as news.
  • But news agency AFP reported on Monday that thousands of the League's supporters took to the streets of the capital Dhaka on Monday in protest.
  • An American editor and newspaperman who reported on the Scopes trial, which concerned evolution.
Synonyms
investigate, look into, enquire into, survey, research, study; write about, write an account of, broadcast details of, cover, describe, give details of, write up; commentate on
1.2 (be reported) Used to indicate that something has been stated, although one cannot confirm its accuracy: [with infinitive]: hoaxers are reported to be hacking into airline frequencies to impersonate air traffic controllers (as adjective reported) he’s now a reported £50,000 in debt
More example sentences
  • Although not reported, the study's findings do not indicate high multicollinearity among cluster variates.
  • However, the captains of the detained ships have been reported as describing the US action as piracy.
  • Although sales fell a reported six percent during the most recent fiscal year, sources remain confident in the sustainability of the Kinkade brand.
1.3 [with object] Make a formal statement or complaint about (someone or something) to the necessary authority: undisclosed illegalities are reported to the company’s directors [with object and complement]: eight Yorkshire terriers have been reported missing in the last month
More example sentences
  • The Communications Authority has called on the general public to make their complaints official by reporting them to the Authority.
  • Garnet was accused of knowing about the plot beforehand and not reporting it to the authorities. he was accused of Jesuitical equivocation.
  • A ferryman to whom they gave a silver 20-shilling piece decided they must be noblemen who were going to fight a duel abroad, and reported them to the authorities.
Synonyms
make a complaint against, make a charge against, inform on, tattle on, accuse
informal blow the whistle on, grass on, shop, tell on, squeal on, rat on, split on, peach on
rare delate on
1.4 [with object] British (Of a parliamentary committee chairman) formally announce that the committee has dealt with (a bill): the Chairman shall report the Bill to the House
1.5 (report something out) US (Of a committee of Congress) return a bill to the legislative body for action: the Committee reported out the Civil Rights Bill, quicker than ever expected
More example sentences
  • Despite what appeared to be widespread support for the bills, they were reported out of committee unfavorably.
  • Historically, bills have been given a three-day delay in between the time the Rules Committee reports them out and the House takes them up; that requirement has been waived on numerous occasions in recent years.
  • That's very important to get that over with in August, to get back in September, have the relevant committees report the legislation out.
2 [no object] Present oneself formally as having arrived at a particular place or as ready to do something: he had to report to the headmaster at 4 pm
More example sentences
  • Finally he simply took refuge in his dressing room and refused to report for his next scene, announcing that he hated his wardrobe.
  • When 100 hopeful young boys report for training camp at the end of the summer, they think they are headed for the usual pre-season good time.
  • Within minutes, firefighters off shift and heading home were calling, reporting in and getting ready to go to work.
Synonyms
present oneself, arrive, appear, turn up, clock in, sign in; make oneself known, announce oneself, come, be present; Britishclock on; North Americanpunch in, punch the (time) clock
informal show up
2.1 (report back) Return to work or duty after a period of absence: hearing that there was the prospect of action with No. 8 Commando, he reported back for duty
More example sentences
  • It has also been learned that the head of strategic development - suspended from duties pending the outcome of the inquiry into overcharging - has reported back for duty.
  • Bettye and Peggy had been told to run out and get something to eat and a quick rest before reporting back for duty.
  • It had nobody on the ground in Washington, networking with legislators and their staffs, listening to the gossip, shooting the breeze - and reporting back to base.
3 [no object] (report to) Be responsible to (a superior or supervisor): he reports to the chairman of the committee
More example sentences
  • Seward responds immediately, and reports to Holmwood.
  • Day-to-day activities varied from helping with the telephone and photocopying to reporting to her supervisor about on-going legislative committee hearings and her own bill-analysis research.
  • Analysts and investment bankers now must report to different supervisors, and they must be physically separated.

noun

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1An account given of a particular matter, especially in the form of an official document, after thorough investigation or consideration by an appointed person or body: the chairman’s annual report
More example sentences
  • However one defines its official status, the report is to a considerable degree at variance with the picture of the Communist Party of the United States given by historians of the American left.
  • A good case can be made against foreign aid simply by perusing the official documents and reports published by government lending agencies themselves.
  • Unwanted annual reports and other shareholder documents may also bother you.
Synonyms
account, review, record, description, exposition, statement, delineation; transactions, proceedings, transcripts, minutes; Frenchcompte rendu, procès-verbal
Military, informal sitrep
1.1A spoken or written description of an event or situation, especially one intended for publication or broadcasting in the media: press reports suggested that the secret police were helping to maintain public order
More example sentences
  • She has investigated the events, the media reports and testimony from victims of those attacks.
  • Media reports suggest Eircom does not intend to use the proceeds of any refinancing to repay equity.
  • Media reports at the time described Yeltsin as ‘a brash bear of a man from the Urals brought to Moscow to boost Gorbachev's reform efforts’.
Synonyms
story, account, description; article, piece, item, column, feature, write-up, exposé; bulletin, communiqué, dispatch, communication
1.2British A teacher’s written assessment of a pupil’s work, progress, and conduct, issued at the end of a term or school year.
More example sentences
  • Teachers can enter progress reports for each student and print a summary progress report when desired.
  • The teacher completes a report and returns it to the student's school counselor at the end of each grading period.
  • Along the way, I must qualify extreme principles in various ways and then challenge my students with examinations and term paper reports about my lectures.
Synonyms
assessment, evaluation, appraisal; marks; North Americanreport card, grades
1.3 Law A detailed formal account of a case heard in a court, giving the main points in the judgement, especially as prepared for publication.
More example sentences
  • The Master of the Court makes policy decisions on investments and supervises her small but well-trained staff in administering these funds and even preparing court reports.
2A piece of information that is unsupported by firm evidence: reports were circulating that the chairman was about to resign
More example sentences
  • We never get a complete picture of Sayonara, merely a series of lively second-hand reports, which is very much the point - through these she achieves a mythical status.
  • According to recent reports, Attorney General Michael McDowell is examining legal options to tackle this growth industry.
  • It's been two years since we first began to hear reports of a promising new wave stirring in Thailand, a country whose cinematic past is almost completely unknown in the West.
Synonyms
news, information, word, intelligence, intimation
literary tidings
archaic advices
rumour, whisper, piece of gossip, piece of hearsay; Frenchon dit
informal buzz
rare bruit
2.1 [mass noun] dated Rumour: report has it that the beetles have now virtually disappeared
3A sudden loud noise of or like an explosion or gunfire: all our horses are very gentle and are accustomed to hearing the report of a .22
More example sentences
  • Their rifles made a common report, when, sinking on his wounded limb, part of the body of the savage came into view.
Synonyms
bang, blast, crack, pop, shot, gunshot; explosion, detonation, boom; crash, noise, sound, echo, reverberation
4An employee who reports to another employee.
More example sentences
  • And, I have been a better, more consistent mentor/teacher to my direct reports.
5 [mass noun] archaic The reputation of someone or something: whatsoever things are lovely and of good report

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French reporter (verb), report (noun), from Latin reportare 'bring back', from re- 'back' + portare 'carry'. The sense 'give an account' gave rise to 'submit a formal report', hence 'inform an authority of one's presence' (sense 2 of the verb, mid 19th century) and 'be accountable to a superior' (sense 3 of the verb, late 19th century).

Phrases

on report

1British During the report stage of a bill in the House of Commons or House of Lords: when the Bill was debated in committee and on report, language was more restrained
2(Especially of a prisoner or member of the armed forces) on a disciplinary charge: lots of girls got put on report for wearing each other’s clothes
More example sentences
  • However, his continued existence on normal location is not without some cost to staff who have to endure an ongoing tirade of abuse and threat which almost any other inmate would find himself on report for.
  • Mark managed to get himself sin-binned and placed on report twice for late challenges but despite their numerical disadvantage Leigh put together their best move of the match to give Maden his second try.
  • I'll have you up on report so fast your head'll spin!

Derivatives

reportable

adjective
More example sentences
  • As such, the western press was almost entirely focused on the impending war and Rachel's killing received relatively little coverage, which did not venture beyond reportable facts and statements.
  • But he didn't have any sort of reaction that really is reportable to say that he reacted in one way or another to her.
  • West Nile Virus encephalitis has recently been added to the list of designated reportable illnesses.

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