There are 3 definitions of roe in English:

roe1

Line breaks: roe
Pronunciation: /rəʊ
 
/

noun

1 (also hard roe) [mass noun] The mass of eggs contained in the ovaries of a female fish or shellfish, especially when ripe and used as food; the full ovaries themselves: lumpfish roe is most like caviar
More example sentences
  • You need smoked cod's roe, which many good fishmongers sell.
  • Increasing in popularity; the most affordable sturgeon roe has a small grain similar to Russian Sevruga.
  • The fish was poached in seaweed and served warm with a tomato concassé, caper berries and finished off with herring roe and a little wasabi.
1.1 (soft roe) The ripe testes of a male fish, especially when used as food.
More example sentences
  • Add the sake to the codfish soft roe and mix to combine.

Origin

late Middle English: related to Middle Low German, Middle Dutch roge.

Definition of roe in:

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Pronunciation: əˈpilēən
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a narrative poem resembling an epic in style...

There are 3 definitions of roe in English:

roe2

Line breaks: roe
Pronunciation: /rəʊ
 
/
(also roe deer)

noun (plural same or roes)

A small Eurasian deer which lacks a visible tail and has a reddish summer coat that turns greyish in winter.
  • Genus Capreolus, family Cervidae: two species, in particular the European roe deer (C. capreolus)
More example sentences
  • They preyed on roe deer, red deer, and wild boar, but were also much loathed and dreaded for their depredations against livestock, especially sheep.
  • New tools and weapons were invented to hunt the animals of the forests such as red deer, roe deer, wild boar, and cattle.
  • At the end of the Anglo-Saxon period they were pursuing red deer and roe deer, animals which are all but absent in earlier bone assemblages.

Origin

Old English rā(ha), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch ree and German Reh.

Definition of roe in: