There are 5 main definitions of shag in English:

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shag1

Line breaks: shag
Pronunciation: /ʃaɡ
 
/

noun

1 [usually as modifier] A carpet or rug with a long, rough pile: wall-to-wall shag carpet
More example sentences
  • A windowless basement with wall-to-wall white shag carpet was what Penny and Tom Friedman encountered when they moved into their townhouse near Washington, DC.
  • She latched onto lines like ‘red carpet treatment at shag carpet prices’ and a ‘whole new age of consumer power.’
  • It shattered, pieces scattering across the orange shag carpet.
1.1 [as modifier] (Of a pile) long and rough: a shag pile
More example sentences
  • But before you rush out to buy luridly coloured shag piles or geometric plastic furniture, bear in mind that he believes this will be retro with a twist.
1.2 [mass noun] Cloth with a velvet nap on one side.
2A thick, tangled hairstyle or mass of hair: her hair was cut short in a boyish shag [as modifier]: a shag cut
More example sentences
  • Logan ran a hand through his strawberry blond shag hair cut and stared down at the two girls in front of him.
  • Fair comment, though it's strange to hear it coming from a guy sporting a mop-top shag haircut straight off the cover of Rubber Soul, a black T-shirt, denim pants and jacket and regulation Ray - Bans.
  • It was covered in stiff, wiry gray hair, with a shag of sorts hanging off its hunched shoulders and thick neck like a mane.
3 (also shag tobacco) [mass noun] A coarse kind of cut tobacco.
Example sentences
  • He stood up and went to the side-table and selected a pipe from his rack, and then went to the Persian slipper near the fireplace that held his shag tobacco.
  • Until recently, books about book dealing and book collecting tended to the agreeably fusty, redolent of shag tobacco and carpet slippers.
  • He tutted to himself, lit up a cherry shag and blew a thin tendril of smoke after them through the reassuring mesh of his cage.

Origin

late Old English sceacga 'rough matted hair', of Germanic origin; related to Old Norse skegg 'beard' and shaw2.

More
  • Shag as in shag pile carpet was sceacga ‘rough matted hair’ in Old English. Of Germanic origin, it is related to Old Norse skegg ‘beard’. The mid 16th-century bird name shag is perhaps a specific use of the word, with reference to the bird's ‘shaggy’ crest. The use of the verb to mean sexual intercourse is first recorded in 1788, but is probably older. It may go back to an older verb meaning ‘shake’ (which may be the origin of shag) which is recorded between the 14th and 16th centuries.

Words that rhyme with shag

bag, blag, brag, Bragg, crag, dag, drag, fag, flag, gag, hag, jag, lag, mag, nag, quag, rag, sag, scrag, slag, snag, sprag, stag, swag, tag, wag, zag

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There are 5 main definitions of shag in English:

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shag2

Line breaks: shag
Pronunciation: /ʃaɡ
 
/

noun

1A western European and Mediterranean cormorant with greenish-black plumage and a long curly crest in the breeding season.
  • Phalacrocorax aristotelis, family Phalacrocoracidae
Example sentences
  • Although the majority of shags, unlike many cormorants, do not normally wander far in winter from their breeding haunts, a small number make prolonged stays on the Norfolk coast.
  • Throughout the isles you'll come across throngs of Arctic terns and both species of skuas, as well as black guillemots, gannets, shags, and Storm and Leach's petrels.
  • These steep pinnacles are now part of the RSPB bird sanctuary populated by the largest Arctic tern colony in north-west Europe, and home to numerous puffins, kittiwakes, shags and fulmars.
1.1chiefly NZ Any cormorant.
Example sentences
  • Other water birds include grey and mallard ducks, black swans, black shags.
  • Again the attraction is bird watching, especially pied shags feeding the young birds in their nests, great crested grebe and large numbers of paradise ducks.
  • The only creatures on the beach were some kayakers and some shags, and around the rocks some seals.

Origin

mid 16th century: perhaps a use of shag1, with reference to the bird's ‘shaggy’ crest.

More
  • Shag as in shag pile carpet was sceacga ‘rough matted hair’ in Old English. Of Germanic origin, it is related to Old Norse skegg ‘beard’. The mid 16th-century bird name shag is perhaps a specific use of the word, with reference to the bird's ‘shaggy’ crest. The use of the verb to mean sexual intercourse is first recorded in 1788, but is probably older. It may go back to an older verb meaning ‘shake’ (which may be the origin of shag) which is recorded between the 14th and 16th centuries.

Phrases

like a shag on a rock

1
Australian informal In an isolated or exposed position: the liner was stuck there like a shag on a rock
More example sentences
  • The reporter stands there with this air of authority but it just makes them look like shags on a rock trying to sell yesterdays news.
  • While the traditional pathways for the Australian Derby are still in place, the jewel in the crown has been left like a shag on a rock.
  • The liner Wanganella was stuck there like a shag on a rock until it was refloated off and away to become a hostel ship for workers.

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There are 5 main definitions of shag in English:

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shag3

Line breaks: shag
Pronunciation: /ʃaɡ
 
/

noun

A dance originating in the US in the 1930s and 1940s, characterized by vigorous hopping from one foot to the other.

Origin

of obscure derivation; perhaps from obsolete shag 'waggle'.

More
  • Shag as in shag pile carpet was sceacga ‘rough matted hair’ in Old English. Of Germanic origin, it is related to Old Norse skegg ‘beard’. The mid 16th-century bird name shag is perhaps a specific use of the word, with reference to the bird's ‘shaggy’ crest. The use of the verb to mean sexual intercourse is first recorded in 1788, but is probably older. It may go back to an older verb meaning ‘shake’ (which may be the origin of shag) which is recorded between the 14th and 16th centuries.

Definition of shag in:

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There are 5 main definitions of shag in English:

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shag4

Line breaks: shag
Pronunciation: /ʃaɡ
 
/

verb

[with object] Baseball
Chase or catch (fly balls) for practice: you run down to the field and hit a few baseballs and shag a few fly balls
More example sentences
  • At the few other games I went to by myself, I also saw him in the outfield talking with teammates while they shagged fly balls.
  • Because there's a word, there's a way to wonder if any of our group shagging baseballs all spring might not have been a girl at all but a hybrid cultivar.
  • Lacy grew up a Senator fan and as a teenager he shagged flies in Griffith Stadium for the likes of Goose Goslin, Joe Judge, Clyde Milan, and Walter Johnson.

Origin

early 20th century: of unknown origin.

More
  • Shag as in shag pile carpet was sceacga ‘rough matted hair’ in Old English. Of Germanic origin, it is related to Old Norse skegg ‘beard’. The mid 16th-century bird name shag is perhaps a specific use of the word, with reference to the bird's ‘shaggy’ crest. The use of the verb to mean sexual intercourse is first recorded in 1788, but is probably older. It may go back to an older verb meaning ‘shake’ (which may be the origin of shag) which is recorded between the 14th and 16th centuries.

Definition of shag in:

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There are 5 main definitions of shag in English:

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shag5

Line breaks: shag
Pronunciation: /ʃaɡ
 
/
British vulgar slang

verb (shags, shagging, shagged)

[with object]
1Have sexual intercourse with (someone).
1.1 [no object] (Of two people) have sexual intercourse.

noun

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1.1 [with adjective] A sexual partner of a specified ability.

Origin

late 18th century: of unknown origin.

More
  • Shag as in shag pile carpet was sceacga ‘rough matted hair’ in Old English. Of Germanic origin, it is related to Old Norse skegg ‘beard’. The mid 16th-century bird name shag is perhaps a specific use of the word, with reference to the bird's ‘shaggy’ crest. The use of the verb to mean sexual intercourse is first recorded in 1788, but is probably older. It may go back to an older verb meaning ‘shake’ (which may be the origin of shag) which is recorded between the 14th and 16th centuries.

Derivatives

shaggable

1
adjective

shagger

2
noun

Definition of shag in:

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