There are 2 definitions of sin in English:

sin1

Line breaks: sin
Pronunciation: /sɪn
 
/

noun

1An immoral act considered to be a transgression against divine law: a sin in the eyes of God [mass noun]: the human capacity for sin
More example sentences
  • We now live in, and scientists study, a creation damaged by human sin and divine judgment.
  • Part of the transgression of a sin is using something holy for an unholy purpose.
  • Cole fears that his supernatural abilities themselves are a sin, and Malcolm's sin is the classic sin of unbelief.
Synonyms
1.1An act regarded as a serious or regrettable fault, offence, or omission: he committed the unforgivable sin of refusing to give interviews
More example sentences
  • They are being met with indifference or active hostility because they have committed the unforgivable sin of cooperating with the Americans.
  • I am a young, ordinary person; I struggle with my life, my faults and my sins just like everyone else.
  • It's my own sin, my own fault and I just want to say I'm sorry.
Synonyms
scandal, crime, disgrace, outrage

verb (sins, sinning, sinned)

[no object] Back to top  
1Commit a sin: I sinned and brought shame down on us
More example sentences
  • Adam sinned and brought death, disease and bloodshed into the world.
  • Because we sinned and thus committed high treason against the God of creation, we don't even deserve to exist!
  • If a person sees another Jew sinning or following the wrong path, he is required to correct him and attempt to set him right.
Synonyms
commit a sin, offend against God, commit an offence, transgress, do wrong, commit a crime, break the law, misbehave, go astray, stray from the straight and narrow, go wrong, fall from grace
archaic trespass
1.1 (sin against) Offend against (God, a person, or a principle): Lord, we have sinned against you
More example sentences
  • To sin against the Holy Spirit is to sin against hope.
  • I hereby forgive everyone who offended or angered me, or sinned against me.
  • To live in this world was to live in the expectation of sinning and being sinned against.

Origin

Old English synn (noun), syngian (verb); probably related to Latin sons, sont- 'guilty'.

Phrases

(as) —— as sin

informal Having a particular undesirable quality to a high degree: as ugly as sin miserable as sin
More example sentences
  • As Marshall commonsensically observes, this whole trial balloon is beside the point, since everything points to the perp or perps being ‘guilty as sin.’
  • They look miserable as sin, but they are all wearing raincoats, and seem to be rather warmer than you.
  • And if you are ugly as sin and suddenly find yourself being chatted up by a pretty female or a handsome male, who wants specific information from you, consider seriously why you are suddenly the centre of attention.

for one's sins

humorous , chiefly British Used to suggest that a task or duty is so onerous or unpleasant that it must be a punishment: he teaches Latin for his sins
More example sentences
  • And for our sins, we tend to take with us Owd Tom, who otherwise rarely gets out of Beggarsdale since he let his son, Mid Tom, take their stock to the auction mart.
  • Andre co-wrote half the tracks, including the annoying Insania, and the cod reggae Mysterious Girl, included twice here for our sins.
  • I happened to watch for the first time the television program Home Front last week and, for my sins, it struck a chord.

like sin

informal Vehemently or forcefully: you can lie like sin to a keyboard
More example sentences
  • Picture Amneris, the slighted daughter of the Pharaohs, in Liz Taylor's inch-thick Cleopatra make-up, eyes glowing like sin, singing with a voice to move the heavens.
  • I suppose the moral of the story is that emoticons do nothing to aid the clarity of some originary emotion at the root of a comment because of the simple fact that you can lie like sin to a keyboard.

live in sin

informal , dated Live together as though married.
More example sentences
  • Back when my wife and I were college room-mates living in sin, we had a cockatiel that really, really liked her.
  • It was perhaps more of a stigma for the children that mother was living in sin than it was for the parents.
  • A great idea for anyone who, like me, is getting married but has been living in sin for years and so has a bottom drawer full of towels, bedding, frying pans and cut glass.

sin of commission

A sinful action.
More example sentences
  • As the parable implies, the fervently devout may have a harder time admitting their sins of commission and omission than the less observant.
  • War and rumors of war are matters of judgments of past failures by all, of sins of commission and omission, of what has been done and what has been left undone.
  • And should my sin of commission or omission create employment, I do not even need to be acquitted.

sin of omission

A sinful failure to perform an action: sins of omission more usually cause such problems
More example sentences
  • For secular Jews though, it is probably more meaningful to directly acknowledge political sins of omission and commission.
  • This part of the book, which overwhelms and depresses readers with the magnitude of ecclesiastical sins of omission and commission, is followed by a welcome section on rescuing and sheltering individuals and organizations.
  • After World War II, the German Protestant churches issued a statement of repentance for their sins of omission and commission during the Third Reich.

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