There are 3 definitions of Slough in English:

Slough

Line breaks: Slough
Pronunciation: /slaʊ
 
/
  • A town in SE England to the west of London; population 119,400 (est. 2009).

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Pronunciation: ˌastrəˈgāSHən
noun
(in science fiction) navigation in outer space

There are 3 definitions of Slough in English:

slough1

Line breaks: slough
Pronunciation: /slaʊ
 
/

noun

  • 1A swamp.
    More example sentences
    • The main landscape feature is endless peat bog, surrounded by marsh, leading into morasses, sloughs and quagmires.
    • Crappie and maybe a few largemouth bass had been the alleged focus of this June morning fishing a swamp slough in southeast Texas.
    • Creeks, sloughs, bayous, and swamps, including a large cypress swamp at the base of Crowley's Ridge, ran around the town.
  • 1.1North American A side channel or inlet, or a natural channel that is only sporadically filled with water: [in place names]: Elkhorn Slough
    More example sentences
    • Hiking trails lace the central portion, where the river breaks down into channels and sloughs.
    • As the sun breaks behind the bush into a crystal clear sky, a few wild water buffalo - leftover imports from more than a century ago - wallow in the sloughs on either side of the road.
    • The mud then spews under the Gapstow Bridge to become a muddy slough that inundates a good part of The Pond, leaving the rest of The Pond aswirl with oil slicks, sludge, and Dixie cups.
  • 2A situation characterized by lack of progress or activity: the economic slough of the interwar years
    More example sentences
    • That is making it nearly impossible to craft monetary policy that is both hawkish on inflation, and doesn't throw huge economies deeper into the slough of economic despond.
    • But for rugby at any rate, it looks as though there is a chance that Scotland may soon exit from the slough of despondency in which we have recently wallowed.
    • For Scotland's future credibility, teachers need to start promoting politics as a high calling in need of rescuing from the slough of self-serving mediocrity in which it is presently mired.

Derivatives

sloughy

adjective
More example sentences
  • Hydrogels form an essential option in treatment regimes for cleansing of sloughy and necrotic wounds.
  • Also the sites where the dew claws were removed never healed properly, forming little sloughy pits.
  • This individual initially presented from the community with a painful, sloughy, neuropathic ulcer.

Origin

Old English slōh, slō(g), of unknown origin.

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Definition of slough in:

There are 3 definitions of Slough in English:

slough2

Line breaks: slough
Pronunciation: /slʌf
 
/

verb

  • 1 [with object] (usually slough something off) Shed or remove (a layer of dead skin): a snake sloughs off its old skin exfoliate once a week to slough off any dry skin
    More example sentences
    • But, as the play moves back in time, she beautifully sheds guilt and stress like a snake sloughing its skin.
    • Eventually the tissue is sloughed at the tentacle tips.
    • So what we're doing is collecting sloughed skin.
    Synonyms
    dispose of, discard, throw away, throw out, get rid of, toss out; shed, jettison, scrap, cast aside/off, repudiate, abandon, relinquish, drop, dispense with, have done with, reject, shrug off, throw on the scrapheap
    informal chuck (away/out), fling away, dump, ditch, axe, bin, junk, get shut of
    British informal get shot of
    North American informal trash
    archaic forsake
  • 1.1Get rid of (something undesirable or no longer required): he is concerned to slough off the country’s bad environmental image
    More example sentences
    • Romania supposedly arose in 1989 to slough off communist dictatorship.
    • Only in death could Kennedy's ` star image ' completely slough off the documented unevenness of his national popularity.
    • The twenty-dollar gift may allow him to slough off the backwardness of the Old World.
  • 1.2 [no object] (slough off) (Of dead skin) drop off; be shed: it is a rare skin disease in which the skin sloughs off
    More example sentences
    • Skin-nourishing bath ingredients include oatmeal, which softens and exfoliates skin, milk and oil, which contain fat and lock in moisture, and salt, which sloughs off dead skin.
    • This is achieved using an intense pulsed light laser that sloughs off dead skin cells and encourages a new layer of cells to come to the surface.
    • It really tightens the skin, sloughs off dead cells, and leaves you with a firm, bright complexion.
  • 2 [no object] (slough away/down) (Of soil or rock) collapse or slide into a hole or depression: an eternal rain of silt sloughs down from the edges of the continents
    More example sentences
    • There, seepage could erode and slough away prized fossil-bearing formations.

noun

[mass noun] Back to top  
  • The dropping off of dead tissue from living flesh: the drugs can cause blistering and slough
    More example sentences
    • Papain/urea debriding ointment is indicated for the debridement of necrotic tissue and liquefaction of slough in acute and chronic lesions.
    • When using a nonselcctive enzyme, limit its application to the necrotic or slough tissue and avoid applying it to viable tissue, such as the surrounding wound area.
    • Necrotic tissue, in the form of yellow slough, filled 10% to 20% of all 3 wound beds.

Derivatives

sloughy

adjective
More example sentences
  • Examination of his oropharynx revealed marked unilateral hypertrophy of his left tonsil, which was firm on palpation with an area of shallow surface ulceration; it was 2cm in diameter with a sloughy, friable base.
  • Single or multiple ulcers typically have a raised, indurated margin and a sloughy base.
  • Shaved the scalp a second time, and brought the edges of the wound in position, the previous edges having sloughed away.

Origin

Middle English (as a noun denoting a skin, especially the outer skin shed by a snake): perhaps related to Low German slu(we) 'husk, peel'. The verb dates from the early 18th century.

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