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sonorous

Line breaks: son¦or|ous
Pronunciation: /ˈsɒn(ə)rəs
 
, səˈnɔːrəs
 
/

Definition of sonorous in English:

adjective

1(Of a person’s voice or other sound) imposingly deep and full: he read aloud with a sonorous and musical voice
More example sentences
  • The tall, square-jawed actor with a deep, sonorous voice made more than 50 films in a career spanning six decades.
  • Gifted with a remarkably deep and sonorous voice, Rashid Khan has excelled in almost all facets of singing.
  • Perhaps if the cast had stronger personalities and more sonorous voices, the production would have a less half-hearted effect.
1.1Capable of producing a deep or ringing sound: the alloy is sonorous and useful in making bells
More example sentences
  • Rich, warm string tone, sweet, elegant winds, and mellow, sonorous brass are the hallmarks of the ‘Saxony sound’.
Synonyms
1.2(Of a speech or style) using imposing language: he relished the sonorous words of condemnation
More example sentences
  • Redmayne's costume (an elegant gown with a high, beehive hairdo) gave him an aristocratic deportment which he emphasised with graceful movements and slow, sonorous speech.
  • He's developed a visceral revulsion toward his fellow humans, a profoundly misanthropic impulse that he dresses up in the sonorous language of ‘biophilia.’
  • Audiences may not always understand what doors King is trying to open, but they do respond to his sonorous language.
Synonyms

Origin

early 17th century: from Latin sonorus (from sonor 'sound') + -ous.

More
  • sound from (Old English):

    There are four different ‘sounds’ in English. The one relating to noise is from Latin sonus. Related words are dissonance (Late Middle English) ‘inharmonious’; resonance (Late Middle English) ‘echo, resound’; resonant (late 16th century); resound (Late Middle English); and sonorous (early 17th century). Sonar, however, is an acronym formed from Sound Navigation and Ranging on the pattern of radar. Sound, meaning ‘in good condition, not damaged or diseased’, is from Old English gesund. In Middle English the prominent sense was ‘uninjured, unwounded’. Use of sound to mean ‘having well-grounded opinions’ dates from the early 16th century; the phrase as sound as a bell appeared in the late 16th century. This puns on the first meaning of sound, and also on the fact that a cracked bell will not ring true. The third sound (Late Middle English) ‘ascertain the depth of water’ is from Old French sonder, based on Latin sub- ‘below’ and unda ‘wave’. The final one for a narrow stretch of water is Middle English from Old Norse sund ‘swimming, strait’, related to swim.

Derivatives

sonorously

1
adverb
Example sentences
  • It was a 10-minute homage to himself, sonorously narrated by Gregory Peck and made on the orders of the White House staff to introduce the new president to a sceptical public after Kennedy's assassination.
  • However, it soon becomes clear, that this is an inversion of cinematic practice, with the sonorously intoned Russian voice-over and English subtitles providing the drive in place of visual information.
  • Bridge is sung sonorously but very low-key and just when you think it is going to fade away like the dying light, the band, a percussive juggernaut, bounces dramatically into Graceland.

sonorousness

2
noun
Example sentences
  • Blake somehow understands, that his sonorousness is a final, sad crumbling of former grandeur.
  • The presence of a very little lead or any similar metal greatly lessens the sonorousness of this alloy; while that of silver increases it.
  • This sonorousness of vindictive words might help to characterize how, say, racist speech works on and in its targets.

Words that rhyme with sonorous

murmurousgenerous

Definition of sonorous in:

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