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spend

Line breaks: spend
Pronunciation: /spɛnd
 
/

Definition of spend in English:

verb (past and past participle spent /spɛnt/)

[with object]
1Give (money) to pay for goods, services, or so as to benefit someone or something: the firm has spent £100,000 on hardware
More example sentences
  • We spent too much money on people that hate us and loathe us and want us out of their country.
  • By now there should be nobody who doesn't agree that how much money we spend per pupil makes a difference.
Synonyms
lavish
informal fork out, shell out, dish out, cough up, blow, splash out, splurge, lash out
British informal stump up, blue
Australian/New Zealand informal knock down
archaic spring
North American informal pony up
1.1Use or give out the whole of; exhaust: she couldn’t buy any more because she had already spent her money the initial surge of interest had spent itself
More example sentences
  • She put her hands on her hips and watched as the can spent itself.
  • The lightning spent itself and the coach fell to the ground unconscious.
  • The last drops of the rainfall spattered heavily against the cobblestones as the storm spent itself and shook itself off.
Synonyms
2Pass (time) in a specified way or in a particular place: she spent a lot of time travelling
More example sentences
  • She spent a sleepless night passing along the police line searching out scraps of news.
  • A driver without a resident's pass wanting to spend three hours in Piccadilly car park must find £6 in coins.
  • Last week the town council passed a motion to spend a day picking up litter around the town.
Synonyms

noun

informal Back to top  
An amount of money paid out: the average spend at the cafe is £10 a head
More example sentences
  • This still amounts to an aggregate spend of several millions.
  • The average spend per child is continuing to rise year-on-year.
  • Microsoft group marketing manager Nick McGrath likens the spend to the amount used in launching a new car.

Origin

Old English spendan, from Latin expendere 'pay out'; partly also a shortening of obsolete dispend, from Latin dispendere 'pay out'.

More
  • expense from (Late Middle English):

    Expense goes back to Latin expendere ‘pay out’, and shares a root with Old English spend.

Phrases

spend a penny

1
British informal Used euphemistically to refer to a need to urinate: you can’t get to sleep when you want to spend a penny
[with reference to the coin-operated locks of public toilets]
More example sentences
  • For years drinkers at The Sally Pussey Inn in Swindon Road have been spending a penny in the avocado-coloured urinals blissfully unaware that they may be worth quite a few pounds.
  • At the Lindale Post Office and General Store, villagers have been spending pounds on the National Lottery to ensure people can go on spending a penny in the public toilet.
  • Supt Lacy said those caught spending a penny in public could be hit with maximum fines of £500.

Derivatives

spendable

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • This means food vouchers spendable only at certain supermarkets, and dispersal to one ‘no choice’ offer of accommodation, often away from existing communities, lawyers and even families.
  • ‘It's still spendable, so it's not exactly scrap,’ Astor pointed out.
  • But having no spendable currency hampered their happiness.

spender

2
noun
Example sentences
  • The biggest spenders in monetary terms are Britain at €41 bn, France at €34 bn and Germany at €24 bn.
  • By far the biggest spenders are the Norwegians and the Finns, who spent almost €50 and €38 per person on haircare products in 2002.
  • The highest spenders are people aged between 45 and 64, this group spending on average €314 each on the net before Christmas.

Definition of spend in:

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