There are 2 main definitions of stent in English:

Share this entry

stent 1

Line breaks: stent

noun

1 Medicine A splint placed temporarily inside a duct, canal, or blood vessel to aid healing or relieve an obstruction.
Example sentences
  • Research has focused on developing methods to reduce or eliminate the potential for restenosis, including drug-eluting stents and radiation therapy.
  • Complications, however, included migration of the stent, occlusion of the stent and obstructions of the cystic duct.
  • A ureteral stent was placed to relieve the obstruction.
1.1An impression or cast of a part or body cavity, used to maintain pressure so as to promote healing, especially of a skin graft.
2 [mass noun] (also Stents) trademark A substance used in dentistry for taking impressions of the teeth.

Origin

Late 19th century: from the name of Charles T. Stent (1807–85), English dentist. The sense 'splint' dates from the 1960s.

Words that rhyme with stent

absent, accent, anent, ascent, assent, augment, bent, cement, cent, circumvent, consent, content, dent, event, extent, ferment, foment, forewent, forwent, frequent, gent, Ghent, Gwent, lament, leant, lent, meant, misrepresent, misspent, outwent, pent, percent, pigment, rent, scent, segment, sent, spent, Stoke-on-Trent, Tashkent, tent, torment, Trent, underspent, underwent, vent, went

Definition of stent in:

Share this entry

 

There are 2 main definitions of stent in English:

Share this entry

stent 2 Line breaks: stent
historical, chiefly Scottish

noun

1An assessment of property made for purposes of taxation: [as modifier]: it was recorded in the stent book
1.1The amount or value assessed; a tax: the next stent is to pay 5 sterling to Allexr

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Assess and charge (a person or a community) for purposes of taxation: stent the Parish of Kildaltan in the ascertained sum

Origin

Middle English: from Old French estente 'valuation', related to Anglo-Norman French extente (see extent).

Definition of stent in:

Share this entry

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources