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stomp

Line breaks: stomp
Pronunciation: /stɒmp
 
/

Definition of stomp in English:

verb

[no object, with adverbial of direction]
1Tread heavily and noisily, typically in order to show anger: Martin stomped off to the spare room
More example sentences
  • The kids stomped around noisily much to the consternation of the waiters who nevertheless stood stoically in attendance.
  • He substituted him with quarter-of-an-hour remaining and the striker showed his anger by stomping past the manager and hurling aside his tracksuit top.
  • Brittany followed closely behind, noisily stomping up the stairs.
1.1 [no object] (stomp on) Tread heavily or stamp on: I stomped on the accelerator
More example sentences
  • During a red light, you know whether you have time to check that map; on a green light, you know whether to start braking a block away - or to stomp on the accelerator, as though you were a Toronto or Montreal driver.
  • He tried to stamp out the fire and succeeded in stomping on her foot.
  • Careening back onto the highway, spraying gravel as he went, Jack stomped on the accelerator and gave chase.
1.2 [with object] chiefly US Deliberately trample or tread heavily on: Cobb proceeded to kick and stomp him viciously
More example sentences
  • Then, she threw down the two halves and stomped them into smaller pieces, and kicked them all around.
  • The benefits of this theory are debatable, but I can tell you it stomps capitalism into the ground when it comes to flying.
  • Smokey the Bear stomps his burly self onto the stage and starts smiling and singing.
1.3 [with object] Stamp (one’s feet): the children were stomping their feet
More example sentences
  • I was hopping around, stomping my feet, arms flailing about in a cross between ‘Riverdance’ and a vertical epileptic fit.
  • I would stomp my little feet until they followed me out to the living room, to the tree, where I would proceed to unwrap all my presents while my parents watched me with a sort of dazed remove.
  • She stomped her foot and stalked off in the same manner.
1.4 [no object] Dance with heavy stamping steps: That’s the beat I like. You can’t really dance to it but you can stomp to it
More example sentences
  • The floor began to vibrate from all of the feet stomping and dancing.
  • Ontanga, with their synchronised dance patterns and thunderous foot stomping, should certainly get the audience's feet moving.
  • He also stomped and slapped his bare feet with a wicked approximation of a flamenco performance.

noun

informal Back to top  
1(In jazz or popular music) a tune or song with a fast tempo and a heavy beat.
Example sentences
  • Like Aerosmith at its best, Buckcherry has both the rhythmic sway to go with its rock-and-roll stomp and the raw charisma to get away with its period pretensions.
  • The tenor saxophonist's rousing stomps and sensitive ballads are deeply imprinted in his fans' memories.
  • Then imagine yourself surrounded by sizzling synths, drunken piano stomps, and lock-step pirate rhythms.
1.1A lively dance performed to music with a fast tempo and heavy beat, involving stamping: their music is perfect for a good old stomp
More example sentences
  • Each Orisha has its own character dance - the ferocious stomp of Shango the god of thunder; the sensuous, watery sway of Oshun, the divinity of love - and Acosta includes some of these dances in Tocororo.
  • Luckily the performers had enough energy to rouse even this heat-weary crowd, with one dance after another full of high-powered jumps, stomps, shimmies, and kicks.
  • From the mambo to street stomp, dance can take you back in time to the big band era, or to faraway lands like Morocco and Brazil.

Origin

early 19th century (originally US dialect): variant of the verb stamp.

Derivatives

stomper

1
noun
a whirling house stomper called ‘What Time is Love’ [in names]: the star attractions included the Clyde Valley Stompers
More example sentences
  • There are nicely judged stompers like ‘Get Up’, weirder workouts such as ‘Cool Hand Luke’, ballads with bite like ‘Heavy Heart’ or irresistible pop rock in the form of the grandly titled ‘The Applecross Wing Commander’.
  • Robust stompers such as Twelve Midnight (part of a suite of variations on Anderson's ‘Midnight ‘theme) will appeal to fans of La Bottine Souriante and Fairport Convention.’
  • Although perhaps less immediate than their debut (there are no storming stompers in the league of ‘Joe's Head’ or ‘Happy Alone’), after repeated listens, the beauty of the tracks begins to emerge.

stompy

2
adjective (stompier, stompiest)
Example sentences
  • A montage of myriad moods, strum strings and sleek synths; from the stompy, so-sexy-it's-wet Home Honey I'm High to the acoustic and assertive Last Boy on Earth, there is simply too much variety on this album to cover here.
  • Outwith festivals, the two sold-out Christmas shows at the SECC will be their biggest British gigs of the year, with 7,000 each night going mental when the stompy disco break of ‘Take Me Out’ kicks in.
  • My neighbours are loud and some of them are stompy, which annoys me.

Words that rhyme with stomp

chomp, clomp, comp, pomp, romp, swamp, tromp, whomp, yomp

Definition of stomp in:

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