There are 2 definitions of swallow in English:

swallow1

Line breaks: swal|low
Pronunciation: /ˈswɒləʊ
 
/

verb

[with object]
  • 2Take in and cause to disappear; engulf: the dark mist swallowed her up
    More example sentences
    • The child, like so many thousands of others in a tragedy unfolding across 10 countries, disappeared, swallowed by a sea that had not been so cruel for more than a century.
    • An explosion of smoke engulfed him, swallowing his body in a flume of colors.
    • The night swallowed him as he disappeared into the trees.
    Synonyms
    engulf, swamp, devour, flood over, overwhelm, overcome, bury, drown, inundatetake over, engulf, absorb, assimilate, incorporate, overrun, overwhelm, swamp
  • 2.1Completely use up (money or resources): debts swallowed up most of the money he had got for the house
    More example sentences
    • Unfortunately, most of the money is swallowed up in bureaucracy and the production of meaningless consultancy reports which benefit nobody.
    • Tshwete should also explain in detail ‘how many resources were swallowed up by what was always a wild-goose chase’.
    • The Met were rightfully hammered and shaken up into a better police force although sadly most of the compensation was swallowed up by feverish vain legal teams.

noun

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  • 1An act of swallowing something, especially food or drink: he downed his drink in one swallow
    More example sentences
    • He handed me his glass and I drank down his last swallow.
    • In another, the sufferer drinks several swallows of water while an accomplice presses on both ear flaps (technically called the tragus).
    • Their glasses clinked lightly, and then they both drank several swallows.
  • 1.1An amount of something swallowed in one action: a swallow of beer
    More example sentences
    • He took a swallow of Tab and rose, taking his bowl to the sink.
    • He took a deep breath and a swallow of water from his mug.
    • Thilda shrugged her shoulders and took a swallow of her mead.

Derivatives

swallowable

adjective
More example sentences
  • But if anything, people seemed to appreciate us putting the text in a more swallowable form.
  • ‘Right now we're developing these chips for brain stimulators, bladder control devices, and even a swallowable camera,’ notes Pelletier.
  • Dr. Annette Smith and colleagues at the University College London have successfully tested in humans a small swallowable gut camera that can be steered around in the gut.

Origin

Old English swelgan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch zwelgen and German schwelgen.

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Word of the day kerf
Pronunciation: kərf
noun
a slit made by cutting with a saw

There are 2 definitions of swallow in English:

swallow2

Line breaks: swal|low
Pronunciation: /ˈswɒləʊ
 
/

noun

  • A migratory swift-flying songbird with a forked tail and long pointed wings, feeding on insects in flight. Compare with woodswallow.
    • Family Hirundinidae: several genera, in particular Hirundo, and numerous species, e.g. the widespread H. rustica (North American name: barn swallow)
    More example sentences
    • The central aim of our study was to demonstrate that both natural and sexual selection have been important in shaping the tail streamer of the barn swallow.
    • Most studies trying to identify the function of external tail feathers in the barn swallow have focused on males; much less attention has been paid to females.
    • The barn swallow is an approximately 20-g passerine, migratory bird that feeds on flying insects captured on the wing.

Phrases

one swallow does not make a summer

proverb A single fortunate event doesn’t mean that what follows will also be good.
More example sentences
  • One swallow does not make a summer, even if this series made ours.
  • When Sligo Rovers defeated Galway I thought to myself that one swallow does not make a summer and the game against Dundalk would be the acid test.
  • A lot of my horses have been wrong, but hopefully we are on the way back - though one swallow does not make a summer.

Origin

Old English swealwe, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch zwaluw and German Schwalbe.

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