Definition of synchronic in English:

synchronic

Line breaks: syn|chron¦ic
Pronunciation: /sɪŋˈkrɒnɪk
 
/

adjective

  • Concerned with something, especially a language, as it exists at one point in time: synchronic linguistics Often contrasted with diachronic.
    More example sentences
    • Currently, linguists generally prefer the synchronic study of spoken language to the diachronic comparison of words in texts, and have tended to regard philology as pre-scientific.
    • From a diachronic viewpoint, languages seem to change from being more pragmatic to more syntactic; from a synchronic perspective, different languages may simply be at different stages of this evolutional circle.
    • One of the tenets of sociolinguistics is that synchronic variation of the type illustrated here and in the examples in Chapter 3 represents a stage in long-term change.

Derivatives

synchronically

adverb
More example sentences
  • Part of the problem in making extrapolations from these patterns to build a theory is that the relationship between language and social structure may vary considerably, both synchronically and diachronically.
  • Each can be studied synchronically or diachronically and the order in which they have been dealt with within a grammar has fluctuated over the years.
  • Reading Scripture diachronically and synchronically, all views provided by the canon would be considered as in a kind of dialogue.

Origin

1920s: from late Latin synchronus (see synchronous) + -ic.

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