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thud

Line breaks: thud
Pronunciation: /θʌd
 
/

Definition of thud in English:

noun

A dull, heavy sound, such as that made by an object falling to the ground: he hit the floor with a terrific thud
More example sentences
  • The elevator slammed into the ground with a dull thud, and the doors screeched open.
  • He and the coffee table hit the ground with a loud thud and the sound for breaking wood.
  • A little later we hear two dull thuds echoing across the valley as one of the Apaches fires its missiles.
Synonyms
thump, clunk, clonk, crash, smash, smack, bang, boom, thunder, wallop;
stomp, stamp, clump, clomp
informal wham, whump

verb (thuds, thudding, thudded)

[no object] Back to top  
1Move, fall, or strike something with a dull, heavy sound: the bullets thudded into the dusty ground (as noun thudding) he heard the hollow thudding of hooves
More example sentences
  • He tumbled down the incline, head over heels amid falling debris, and thudded against something soft.
  • We were flying over the land as the pounding of the hooves thudded in our hearts.
  • His heavy boots thudded against the pavement of a desolate road as he kept on walking in a semiconscious daze.
Synonyms
thump, clunk, clonk, crash, smash, smack, bang, thunder;
stomp, stamp, clump, clomp
informal wham, whump
1.1 (as adjective thudding) Used to emphasize the clumsiness or awkwardness of something: great thudding conversation-stoppers
More example sentences
  • The tone was set when Sutton rumbled through the back of little Graham Weir in the opening minutes with a thudding tackle which, in fairness, took the ball.
  • They are rehearsing the opera in a community hall in Mudchute, a desolate stretch of the Isle of Dogs trapped between the banking towers of Canary Wharf and the thudding aimlessness of deprived estates.
  • He maintains with a thudding predictability that success hasn't changed him.

Origin

late Middle English (originally Scots): probably from Old English thyddan 'to thrust, push'; related to thoden 'violent wind'. The noun is recorded first denoting a sudden blast or gust of wind, later the sound of a thunderclap, whence a dull, heavy sound. The verb dates from the early 16th century.

Derivatives

thuddingly

1
adverb
[as submodifier]: rarely has a life-affirming finale seemed more thuddingly sentimental
More example sentences
  • Perhaps troubled by the thought that his approach is too understated, he revisits the theme in the thuddingly titled Song 3.
  • For a band so thuddingly mainstream as Coldplay, they do seem to have a good line in sensing public opinion.
  • But more often than not, shows that unfurl in real time are thuddingly dull.

Words that rhyme with thud

blood, bud, crud, cud, dud, flood, Judd, mud, rudd, scud, spud, stud, sudd

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