There are 4 definitions of till in English:

till1

Line breaks: till
Pronunciation: /tɪl
 
/

preposition & conjunction

Less formal way of saying until.
More example sentences
  • As it happens, the lads are a little bleary-eyed today, having partied till late the previous night.
  • The police refused till the previous owners were tracked down and said that would require too much police work.
  • The revelers partied on till midnight, until everyone had their fill of food, drink and dancing.
Synonyms
until, up to, up till, up until, as late as, up to the time of/that, until such time as, pending; North Americanthroughbefore, prior to, previous to, up to, until, up until, up till, earlier than, in advance of, ante-, pre-

Origin

Old English til, of Germanic origin; related to Old Norse til 'to', also ultimately to till3.

Usage

In most contexts till and until have the same meaning and are interchangeable. The main difference is that till is generally considered to be the more informal of the two, and occurs less frequently than until in writing. Until also tends to be the natural choice at the beginning of a sentence: until very recently, there was still a chance of rescuing the situation. Interestingly, while it is commonly assumed that till is an abbreviated form of until (the spellings ‘till and ’til reflect this), till is in fact the earlier form. Until appears to have been formed by the addition of Old Norse und ‘as far as’ several hundred years after the date of the first records for till.

Definition of till in:

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Word of the day inamorata
Pronunciation: inˌaməˈrätə
noun
a person's female lover

There are 4 definitions of till in English:

till2

Line breaks: till
Pronunciation: /tɪl
 
/

noun

A cash register or drawer for money in a shop, bank, or restaurant: there were queues at the till checkout tills
More example sentences
  • What follows is the city economy in decline, no money in the tills and shops closing.
  • The robbers forced the drawers from the two tills on the main counter and the drive-through and ran off with an undisclosed amount of money.
  • Questions were raised as to why barcodes were missing from stock and receipts were not used when money passed through the shop tills.
Synonyms
cash register, cash box, cash drawer, strongbox; checkout, cash desk, pay desk, counter

Origin

late Middle English (in the general sense 'drawer or compartment for valuables'): of unknown origin.

Phrases

have (or with) one's fingers (or hand) in the till

Used in reference to theft from one’s place of work: he was caught with his hand in the till and sacked
More example sentences
  • He ran a bank in Jordan in the 1980s, but had to flee Amman in 1989 when he allegedly was caught with his hand in the till.
  • That poor bloke has been caught with his hand in the till over his EU expenses.
  • A bar worker at a the hotel was caught with his fingers in the till after management set up a covert surveillance system.
Synonyms
steal, thieve, rob one's employer, help oneself, embezzle, misappropriate funds

Definition of till in:

There are 4 definitions of till in English:

till3

Line breaks: till
Pronunciation: /tɪl
 
/

verb

[with object]
Prepare and cultivate (land) for crops: no land was being tilled or crops sown
More example sentences
  • Aggie and her husband Pat were farming people who tilled the land, harvested the crops and raised livestock.
  • The Tongas whose major occupation has been agriculture used livestock for tilling the land, getting milk for sale and home consumption.
  • Just a quarter of the country's farm land is tilled under valid land use contracts.
Synonyms
cultivate, work, farm, plough, dig, spade, turn over, turn up, break up, loosen, harrow, prepare, fertilize, plant
literary delve

Origin

Old English tilian 'strive for, obtain by effort', of Germanic origin; related to Dutch telen 'produce, cultivate' and German zielen 'aim, strive', also ultimately to till1. The current sense dates from Middle English.

Derivatives

tillable

adjective
More example sentences
  • ‘Only about 5 acres were tillable,’ he recalls.
  • ‘It had just three acres of tillable ground on a beautiful mountain side, but very rocky, rough conditions,’ Andrew remembers.
  • The land consists of 30 acres of tillable fields, a creek, and hundreds of tall maple trees.

Definition of till in:

There are 4 definitions of till in English:

till4

Line breaks: till
Pronunciation: /tɪl
 
/

noun

[mass noun] Geology
Boulder clay or other sediment deposited by melting glaciers or ice sheets.
More example sentences
  • Glacial tills (boulder clays) and their ancient equivalents, tillites, are of this type.

Origin

late 17th century (originally Scots, denoting shale): of unknown origin.

Definition of till in: