There are 3 main definitions of tit in English:

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tit 1

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noun

1A small songbird that searches acrobatically for insects among foliage and branches. Also called titmouse or (in North America) chickadee.
Example sentences
  • This behavior is especially prevalent among chickadees and tits that scatter hoard food items in foliage, branches, and bark of trees.
  • Scurrying about in the woodland fringes, hedges and feeding sites are finches, tits and thrushes keep your eyes open for the occasional hen harrier, merlin and sparrowhawk.
  • He pointed out that not only pigeons live in the South Parade area, but ravens, jackdaws, collared doves, blackbirds, thrushes, wagtails, tits and the now-endangered house sparrow.
1.1Used in names of birds that are similar or related to the tits, e.g. penduline tit, New Zealand tit.

Origin

Mid 16th century: probably of Scandinavian origin and related to Icelandic titlingur 'sparrow'; compare with titling2 and titmouse. Earlier senses were 'small horse' and 'girl'; the current sense dates from the early 18th century.

More
  • Few words in English have such snigger-inducing contrasts in meaning. In the name for small songbirds, tit is probably of Scandinavian origin and related to Icelandic titlingur ‘sparrow’. It first appeared in English in the Middle Ages in the longer equivalent titmouse, though mice had nothing to do with it—the second element was originally mose, which also meant ‘tit’. It changed to mouse in the 16th century, probably because of the bird's small size and quick movements. In Old English a tit was a teat or nipple—it is from the same root as teat (Middle English). In modern English it is a term for a woman's breast, a use that arose in the USA in the early 20th century. Since the 1970s British tits and bums and American tits and ass have suggested crudely sexual images of women. As a name for a foolish person, used since the 19th century, tit may be the same word, or it may have evolved from twit.

Words that rhyme with tit

acquit, admit, backlit, bedsit, befit, bit, Brit, Britt, chit, commit, demit, dit, emit, fit, flit, frit, git, grit, hit, intermit, it, kit, knit, legit, lickety-split, lit, manumit, mishit, mitt, nit, omit, outsit, outwit, permit, pit, Pitt, pretermit, quit, remit, retrofit, sit, skit, slit, snit, spit, split, sprit, squit, submit, transmit, twit, whit, wit, writ, zit

Definition of tit in:

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There are 3 main definitions of tit in English:

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tit 2 Line breaks: tit

noun

1 vulgar slang A woman’s breast.
Example sentences
  • I spread myself over him and rubbed my tits all over his chest.
  • Yes, you get to see the nipples on the finest tits in this hemisphere.
  • Now I don't actually have a problem with this, but I have to say that after a while I do start feeling self-conscious when guys just stare at my tits, or more precisely my nipples.
1.1British informal A foolish or ineffectual person.
Example sentences
  • The tit won fair and square, probably, but that doesn't make him any less odious, or any more right, or any more moral!
  • Number five, laugh uproariously as five fire engines come roaring up your street at four in the morning because some tit set off the fire alarm in the halls.
  • This morning my alarm clock woke me up, and I switched it to snooze thinking ‘what a tit, I set my alarm and it's Saturday.’
2 military slang A button that is pushed to fire a gun or release a bomb.

Phrases

get on someone's tits

1
British vulgar slang Irritate someone intensely.
Example sentences
  • One of the housemates is seriously getting on my tits, and that's Michelle - for no other reason than she keeps calling people ‘chicken’.
  • The American was still with us and Igor was really getting on my tits by this time.
  • Whatever he's up to he looks well on it, and whatever it is, it's getting on my tits.

tits and ass

2
(or chiefly British tits and bums)
vulgar slang, chiefly North American Used in reference to the use of crudely sexual images of women.
Example sentences
  • ‘Even if guys tune in to watch tits and ass, they're going to end up with a lot of touching, realistic scenes,’ he promises.
  • Although most of the constructions of women's sexuality in hardcore tend to be reductionist images of women as hyper-erotic specimens of tits and ass, Black women feel particularly objectified as the Other.
  • De Sade is presented mainly as a heterosexual libertine, and the red-tinted orgy sequences show lots of bare tits and ass but of course no actual fucking.

Origin

Old English tit 'teat, nipple', of Germanic origin; related to Dutch tit and German Zitze. The vulgar slang use was originally US and dates from the early 20th century.

More
  • Few words in English have such snigger-inducing contrasts in meaning. In the name for small songbirds, tit is probably of Scandinavian origin and related to Icelandic titlingur ‘sparrow’. It first appeared in English in the Middle Ages in the longer equivalent titmouse, though mice had nothing to do with it—the second element was originally mose, which also meant ‘tit’. It changed to mouse in the 16th century, probably because of the bird's small size and quick movements. In Old English a tit was a teat or nipple—it is from the same root as teat (Middle English). In modern English it is a term for a woman's breast, a use that arose in the USA in the early 20th century. Since the 1970s British tits and bums and American tits and ass have suggested crudely sexual images of women. As a name for a foolish person, used since the 19th century, tit may be the same word, or it may have evolved from twit.

Definition of tit in:

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There are 3 main definitions of tit in English:

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tit 3 Line breaks: tit

noun

(in phrase tit for tat)
The infliction of an injury or insult in return for one that one has suffered: [as modifier]: the conflict staggered on with tit-for-tat assassinations
More example sentences
  • After this it was tit for tat but in the few remaining minutes of injury time Ballinakill managed to score two points to give them a two point victory on a score of 3-12 to 3-10.
  • Reciprocity is not tit for tat, keeping score or revenge.
  • But we do use the passes a lot and this seems a bit tit for tat.
Synonyms
revenge, vengeance, retribution, requital, recrimination, an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth, as good as one gets, getting even, redress, repayment, payback;
informala taste of someone's own medicine

Origin

Mid 16th century: variant of obsolete tip for tap.

More
  • Few words in English have such snigger-inducing contrasts in meaning. In the name for small songbirds, tit is probably of Scandinavian origin and related to Icelandic titlingur ‘sparrow’. It first appeared in English in the Middle Ages in the longer equivalent titmouse, though mice had nothing to do with it—the second element was originally mose, which also meant ‘tit’. It changed to mouse in the 16th century, probably because of the bird's small size and quick movements. In Old English a tit was a teat or nipple—it is from the same root as teat (Middle English). In modern English it is a term for a woman's breast, a use that arose in the USA in the early 20th century. Since the 1970s British tits and bums and American tits and ass have suggested crudely sexual images of women. As a name for a foolish person, used since the 19th century, tit may be the same word, or it may have evolved from twit.

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