Definition of title in English:

title

Line breaks: title
Pronunciation: /ˈtʌɪt(ə)l
 
/

noun

1The name of a book, composition, or other artistic work: the author and title of the book
More example sentences
  • Previous research has demonstrated that knowledge of book titles and authors' names is reflective of immersion in a literate environment.
  • A similar methodology governs the narrator's reading, since she selects books according to categorised titles: women's names or cities.
  • If you Google any of the above names, with the titles of their famous books, you get hundreds, if not thousands, of links.
Synonyms
name, subtitle; subject
1.1A caption or credit in a film or broadcast: Rumbelows will get exclusive sponsorship with opening and closing titles
More example sentences
  • The group achieved immediate success by producing excellent wartime propaganda shorts as well as film titles and graphics for documentaries.
  • Like Harry Lime, the penicillin-diluting racketeer he plays in the film, Welles infects The Third Man from opening titles to closing credits.
  • But still, the plate is important enough to get its own credit during the opening titles.
Synonyms
caption, legend, inscription, label, heading, subheading, head, motto, slogan, device, wording, rubric; credit
1.2A book, magazine, or newspaper considered as a publication: the company publishes 400 titles a year
More example sentences
  • The number of newspaper titles published diminished in all belligerent nations as the war progressed, as did the size of those which survived, but circulations often increased.
  • There are reprints of popular titles in colourful paperbacks at special prices.
  • This book is a revised and updated edition of the same title published in 1993.
Synonyms
2A name that describes someone’s position or job: Leese assumed the title of director general
More example sentences
  • For each, give your job title, the name of the company and the period of employment.
  • It is a good idea to write down the exact dates and times of the incident you are making your complaint about, along with the names and job titles of any staff involved.
  • Otherwise, we have some interesting company names and job titles.
2.1A word such as Lord or Dame that is used before someone’s name, or a form that is used instead of someone’s name, to indicate high social or official rank: he will inherit the title of Duke of Marlborough
More example sentences
  • However, the highest ranked officials have titles that are more secular in origin.
  • He is not to be confused with Arthur himself, who inherits the title of Lord Godalming.
  • She immediately resented her choice to use his title instead of his name.
Synonyms
designation, name, denomination, label, rank, status, office, position; form of address, epithet, style
informal moniker, handle
formal appellation
2.2A word such as Mrs or Dr that is used before someone’s name to indicate their profession or marital status: the title Professor is reserved for one or two members of a department
More example sentences
  • He had no answer to my next question, which was why on a class list it was even necessary to know, or why the women were singled out to have titles indicating their marital status.
  • Certain professional titles may replace those just mentioned.
  • In the U.S., professors routinely use their titles, which are an important part of their credentials.
2.3A descriptive or distinctive name that is earned or chosen: the restaurant deserved the title of Best Restaurant of the Year
More example sentences
  • Michael Caine's role in the classic Get Carter has earned the title of nastiest screen character of all time.
  • This distinguishes Taimu from other mountains and earns it the title of ‘Fairyland on the Sea’.
  • TV's Pioneer is one of the many titles Milton Berle has earned, but he got into show business long before Americans started turning on the tube.
3The position of being the champion of a major sports competition: Davis won the world title for the first time in 1981
More example sentences
  • The men and women's national teams currently hold five of the seven major championship titles.
  • Would he have won Champions League crowns, major domestic titles, perhaps even a Footballer of the Year award?
  • He won five British championship titles and competed on the Grand Prix circuit for seven years during an impressive riding career.
Synonyms
championship, first place, crown, belt, medal, prize, trophy, cup, shield, plate; laurels, bays, palm, honour, accolade
4 [mass noun] Law A right or claim to the ownership of property or to a rank or throne: a grocery family had title to the property [count noun]: the buyer acquires a good title to the goods
More example sentences
  • The company has the legal and beneficial title to its property.
  • Legal title to the property was taken by the parties as joint tenants.
  • The land registry documentation makes clear that legal title to the property was held in the name of the company.
Synonyms
ownership of, proprietorship of, freehold of, entitlement to, right to, proprietary rights to, claim to; possession of, holding of, hold of, tenure of, control of, keeping of, charge of, custody of, guardianship of
5(In church use) a fixed sphere of work and source of income as a condition for ordination.
5.1A parish church in Rome under a cardinal.

verb

[with object and complement] Back to top  
Give a name to (a book, composition, or other work): a report titled The Lost Land
More example sentences
  • The interesting thing is that you don't title the works until they're complete?
  • Wiley customarily titles his work after the source image he has altered, while his portrait subjects remain anonymous.
  • You'd think a high school would take pains not to title their cookbook so that it sounded like, well, a high school project.
Synonyms
call, entitle, name, dub, give something the title of, designate, label, tag, describe something as, style, term, christen, baptize

Origin

Old English titul, reinforced by Old French title, both from Latin titulus 'inscription, title'. The word originally denoted a placard or inscription placed on an object, giving information about it, hence a descriptive heading in a book or other composition.

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Pronunciation: abˈjo͝or
verb
solemnly renounce (a belief, cause, or claim)