There are 2 main definitions of twit in English:

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twit 1

Line breaks: twit

noun

informal , chiefly British
A silly or foolish person.
Example sentences
  • Both camps, according to White House insiders, are silly twits.
  • He thought of them as the lowest of low in the class known as CTJN class, the ‘creeps, twits, jerks and nerds’ class.
  • While I'd seen my fair share of mediocre upper middle-class twits leapfrog their contemporaries, I really believed that the results-driven media game was largely a meritocracy.

Derivatives

twittish

1
Pronunciation: /ˈtwɪtɪʃ/
adjective
Example sentences
  • Those who report on Washington, write columns or work on editorials are among the most twittish.
  • I think what you didn't realize is how twittish and silly your non-helpful post is in a group like this.
  • By the way, since you responded: Shall I take this as a sign that you are a twittish loser?

Origin

1930s (earlier dialect, in the sense 'talebearer'): perhaps from twit2.

More
  • The kind of twit that is a silly or foolish person dates only from the 1930s and comes from an English dialect use that meant ‘a tale-bearer’. It may come from twit in the sense ‘to tease or taunt someone, especially in a good-humoured way’, which is a shortening of Old English ætwītan ‘reproach with’.

Words that rhyme with twit

acquit, admit, backlit, bedsit, befit, bit, Brit, Britt, chit, commit, demit, dit, emit, fit, flit, frit, git, grit, hit, intermit, it, kit, knit, legit, lickety-split, lit, manumit, mishit, mitt, nit, omit, outsit, outwit, permit, pit, Pitt, pretermit, quit, remit, retrofit, sit, skit, slit, snit, spit, split, sprit, squit, submit, transmit, whit, wit, writ, zit

Definition of twit in:

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There are 2 main definitions of twit in English:

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twit 2 Line breaks: twit

verb (twits, twitting, twitted)

[with object] informal
Tease or taunt (someone), especially in a good-humoured way: her playmates could not twit her about her pigtail
More example sentences
  • Three cheers therefore for the man, who a day later in The Times skilfully twitted his ignorant colleague.
  • I like to twit my family somewhat, as this will show.
  • A Rastafarian waving a flag twitted me as I pushed through the noisy crowd.

Origin

Old English ætwītan 'reproach with', from æt 'at' + wītan 'to blame'.

More
  • The kind of twit that is a silly or foolish person dates only from the 1930s and comes from an English dialect use that meant ‘a tale-bearer’. It may come from twit in the sense ‘to tease or taunt someone, especially in a good-humoured way’, which is a shortening of Old English ætwītan ‘reproach with’.

Definition of twit in:

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