Definition of univocal in English:

univocal

Line breaks: uni|vocal
Pronunciation: /ˌjuːnɪˈvəʊk(ə)l
 
, juːˈnɪvək(ə)l
 
/

adjective

Philosophy & Linguistics
(Of a word or term) having only one possible meaning; unambiguous: a univocal set of instructions
More example sentences
  • The univocal word brings forth a world - however subsequently modified.
  • Different though they will be, each people's theoretical construction of an event ontology would be expected to be univocal.
  • Seemingly then the first of agents, to which all agency is traced back, will be a univocal agent; and so the words used of God and creatures must be univocal.

Derivatives

univocality

Pronunciation: /ˌjuːnɪvə(ʊ)ˈkalɪti/
noun
More example sentences
  • While postmodern feminism rejects the universality of truth, justice and objectivity and the univocality of ‘women,’ analytic feminism defends these notions.
  • If this attention to small linguistic details cannot satisfy us that there is a convincing univocality to the Scriptures, we must admit that the NT has mixed messages regarding ecclesial leadership by women.
  • For Stewart, the mullum in parvo offers ‘a kind of univocality, a form of absolute closure; its function is to close down discourse and not to open the wounds of its inadequacies.’

univocally

adverb
More example sentences
  • Spacetime coincidences play this privileged ontic role because they are invariant and, thus, univocally determined.
  • So the one science falls under the other ‘almost univocally.’
  • Someone might want to have a certain desire, in other words, but univocally want that desire to be unsatisfied.

Definition of univocal in:

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Word of the day retroflex
Pronunciation: ˈretrəˌfleks
adjective
turned backward