There are 2 main definitions of utter in English:

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utter1

Line breaks: utter
Pronunciation: /ˈʌtə
 
/

adjective

[attributive]
Complete; absolute: Charlotte stared at her in utter amazement
More example sentences
  • To walk into a bar even with a toy gun was an act of absolute and utter madness.
  • You seem to have found a balance between absolute asceticism and utter hedonism.
  • He looked back and there was Megan, standing at the door with a tear stained face, her expression showing pure and utter confusion and disbelief.
Synonyms

Origin

Old English ūtera, ūttra 'outer', comparative of ūt 'out'; compare with outer.

More
  • There are two utters in English. Old English, ūttra meaning ‘outer’, is the comparative of ūt ‘out’, just as inner is of in; it was in very frequent use in this sense from around 1400 to 1620 (Milton Paradise Lost: ‘Drive them out From all Heav'ns bounds into the utter Deep’). The sense ‘extreme, complete’ became very common from around 1515 (Shakespeare Henry VI, Part 1: ‘The utter losse of all the Realme’). The other utter is from Middle Dutch. An early, now obsolete use, was ‘put (goods) on to the market, sell’; later meaning ‘circulate (money) as legal tender’ and ‘publish’. The basic notion is one of ‘put forth’ which is carried over into the meaning ‘declare, speak’.

Definition of utter in:

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There are 2 main definitions of utter in English:

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utter2

Line breaks: utter
Pronunciation: /ˈʌtə
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Make (a sound) with one’s voice: he uttered an exasperated snort
More example sentences
  • Stepping back, he opened his mouth to speak but could not utter a sound.
  • The now familiar voice sounded yet a third time, uttering the first sound I heard after my prayer.
  • Arthur opened his mouth to protest or demand an explanation - but let his mouth hang open without uttering a sound.
Synonyms
emit, let out, give, produce, give vent to, issue, come out with, breathe
1.1Say (something) aloud: they are busily scribbling down every word she utters
More example sentences
  • She blinked stupidly at him, too shocked to utter a word.
  • The threatening tone in which he uttered those words would once have made her flinch, but she did not.
  • The little boy utters the same encouraging words she used to cheer him up.
Synonyms
voice, express, put into words, speak, say, deliver, sound, mouth, breathe, articulate, pronounce, enunciate, verbalize, vocalize, state, declare
2 Law Put (forged money) into circulation.
Example sentences
  • A day later he was granted bail for offences of conspiracy to utter counterfeit currency and conspiracy to defraud.
  • That man, who had pleaded guilty to forging and uttering, filled out his electoral return wrongly, took money that he said he would not take, and filled in his ministerial return as being nil.
  • There was one offence after the other: covering up the books, uttering, forging, and falsifying cheques, and on top of that there were five drink-driving convictions.

Origin

late Middle English: from Middle Dutch ūteren 'speak, make known, give currency to coins'.

More
  • There are two utters in English. Old English, ūttra meaning ‘outer’, is the comparative of ūt ‘out’, just as inner is of in; it was in very frequent use in this sense from around 1400 to 1620 (Milton Paradise Lost: ‘Drive them out From all Heav'ns bounds into the utter Deep’). The sense ‘extreme, complete’ became very common from around 1515 (Shakespeare Henry VI, Part 1: ‘The utter losse of all the Realme’). The other utter is from Middle Dutch. An early, now obsolete use, was ‘put (goods) on to the market, sell’; later meaning ‘circulate (money) as legal tender’ and ‘publish’. The basic notion is one of ‘put forth’ which is carried over into the meaning ‘declare, speak’.

Derivatives

utterable

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • In his conception, representation comprised two essential elements, the visible and the utterable.
  • The visible, rather than being subsidiary to the spoken word, repeatedly encompassed both the utterable and the unutterable.
  • There is nothing she can say, for the cause of her anxiety is not utterable.

utterer

2
noun
Example sentences
  • If we really believe that God speaks through the Church then of course we believe that the Church will utter things which even the utterer does not fully comprehend.
  • In ‘The Discourse of History,’ Barthes parallels the objective type of historian's concealment of himself as utterer of his own discourse to that of the so called ‘realist’ novelist.
  • New sets of words, new collocations of old phrases are new, whatever the expressed intention of the utterer.

Definition of utter in:

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