Definition of valetudinarian in English:

valetudinarian

Line breaks: val|etu¦din|ar¦ian
Pronunciation: /ˌvalɪtjuːdɪˈnɛːrɪən
 
/

noun

1A person who is unduly anxious about their health.
More example sentences
  • Emma, a clever, pretty, and self-satisfied young woman, is the daughter, and mistress of the house, of Mr Woodhouse, an amiable old valetudinarian.
  • The English people are a nation of valetudinarians, but there is not sufficient nutriment in their food, which seems to consist mainly of chilled meat.
  • I replied by giving him a full, complete, and accurate history of my ailments, after the manner of valetudinarians.
Synonyms
hypochondriac, neurotic, invalid, valetudinary; Frenchmalade imaginaire
archaic melancholico
1.1A person suffering from poor health.
More example sentences
  • Here are always to be seen a great number of valetudinarians from the West Indies, seeking for the renovation of health, exhausted by the debilitating nature of their sun, air, and modes of living.
  • A trickle of visitors soon turned to a flood and the Silesian peasant was, by the beginning of the 1840s, personally ministering to hundreds of valetudinarians a year.
  • The group highly recommended with the vaccination include citizens above 60 years old, people with chronic diseases, valetudinarians, medical workers, primary school students and kindergartners.

adjective

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1Showing undue concern about one’s health: the valetudinarian English
More example sentences
  • In their fascinating and eloquent valetudinarian correspondence, Adams and Jefferson had a great deal to say about religion.
Synonyms
hypochondriac, self-obsessed, neurotic, obsessed with one's health; sickly, ailing, poorly, in poor health, weak, feeble, frail, delicate, debilitated, invalid, bedridden, infirm, washed out, run down, valetudinary
archaic splenetic
rare hipped, hippish
1.1Suffering from poor health.
More example sentences
  • Diseases cannot be cured by mummifying the valetudinarian victim's mortal vessel in bandages.

Origin

early 18th century: from Latin valetudinarius 'in ill health' (from valetudo 'health', from valere 'be well') + -an.

Derivatives

valetudinarianism

noun
More example sentences
  • Theatre exists in such an eternally precarious state of valetudinarianism that observers keep predicting its imminent demise.
  • Personally I don't need an absolute to enable me to distinguish between, say, the good of kindness and the evil of slander, or the good of health and the evil of valetudinarianism.
  • These monuments to Victorian valetudinarianism were packed with patented paraphernalia such as exercise machines and weightlifting contraptions.

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