Definition of vest in English:

vest

Line breaks: vest
Pronunciation: /vɛst
 
/

noun

1British An undergarment worn on the upper part of the body, typically having no sleeves.
More example sentences
  • The appeal is now in its final week and priority should be given to the gift donation of vests, warm undergarments, toiletries and socks.
  • The major contributions include vests, warm undergarments, warm socks and toiletries.
  • They go with everything, look good with a sun tan, can be used as vests under shirts if the weather turns cold and can be slipped on over a swimming costume if the sun gets too strong.
1.1 (also vest top) A woman’s sleeveless top: she stepped out in a striped vest and skinny jeans with strappy black heels Kim looked chic in her pink jeans and white vest top
More example sentences
  • At the entrance, the girls, who were wearing vest tops, were given T-shirts to cover their shoulders.
  • The women, dressed in skinny jeans and vest tops, swoop in and out.
  • The colour schemes are bright, with yellow and pink tie-dyes and vest tops matched with acid-washed denim.
2A garment worn on the upper part of the body for a particular purpose: a running vest a bulletproof vest
More example sentences
  • Some of the police were dressed in black fatigues; others were wearing suits underneath bullet-proof vests.
  • It has not been much warmer in France than it was in Belgium and we started the first stage in leg warmers, thermal vests, gloves and hats.
  • She spent the last few minutes before the race wearing an ice vest to keep her body temperature down.
3US & Australian A waistcoat or sleeveless jacket.
More example sentences
  • He settled on a conservative gray jacket with a darker vest beneath it.
  • The only decent thing he wore was the sturdy red vest, almost a sleeveless jacket, with black embroidery at the neck and arm holes.
  • After a couple of outfits, Sara decided on a sleeveless leather vest and a loose wrap skirt and broad belt.

verb

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1 [with object] (usually be vested in) Confer or bestow (power, authority, property, etc.) on someone: executive power is vested in the President
More example sentences
  • Article II vested the executive power of the federal government in a president and vice president, both elected for four-year terms by specially chosen electors.
  • An Arab diplomat, going further, said Arab countries would oppose vesting any authority in the Governing Council.
  • He is the rightful representative of the people of Florida and he is the chief executive, in whom the power is vested to execute the law and protect the rights of citizens.
Synonyms
entrust to, invest in, bestow on, confer on, grant to, give to; endow, lodge, lay, place; put in the hands of
1.1 (usually be vested with) Give (someone) the legal right to power, property, etc. the local planning authorities are vested with powers to regulate land use and development
More example sentences
  • During inauguration, the president is vested with the power and authority of the office.
  • Because my theory is that individuals are vested with enormous powers that tend to threaten the state.
  • The civic bodies must be given the task of local distribution and could also be vested with the powers to award the local distribution contracts, provided there is a foolproof mechanism for quality control.
1.2 [no object] (vest in) (Of power, property, etc.) come into the possession of: the bankrupt’s property vests in his trustee
More example sentences
  • It relies on Section 71 of the B.I.A. that once an assignment in bankruptcy is made, all of the bankrupt's property vests in his or her Trustee.
  • Now in bankruptcy the property of a bankrupt vests in his trustee upon the making of the sequestration order.
  • It was given to trustees and the property was vested in the Charity Commissioners for the benefit of Haxby people.
2 [no object] (Of a chorister or member of the clergy) put on vestments: he approaches the altar to vest for Mass
More example sentences
  • We discussed the service as I vested, then waited in the sacristy for the sound of feet on the chapel floor.
2.1 [with object] literary Dress (someone): the Speaker vested him with a rich purple robe
More example sentences
  • Now she was vested for the anointing; buskins, sandals and girdle put on, and over all a tabard of white sarsnet, the vestment called the colobium sindonis.
  • He was fully vested, with a blue brocade chasuble over his white alb.
  • But Jesus is not an ordinary king; he is vested not in fine silks and jewels but in garments of humility and suffering.

Origin

late Middle English (as a verb): from Old French vestu 'clothed', past participle of vestir, from Latin vestire; the noun (early 17th century, denoting a loose outer garment) from French veste, via Italian from Latin vestis 'garment'.

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