Definition of vibrate in English:

vibrate

Line breaks: vi|brate
Pronunciation: /vʌɪˈbreɪt
 
/

verb

1Move continuously and rapidly to and fro: [no object]: the cabin started to vibrate [with object]: the bumblebee vibrated its wings for a few seconds
More example sentences
  • Neils Bohr's model of the atom, set forth in a series of papers in 1913, described atoms as constantly in motion, continuously vibrating, and moving.
  • He would then swim in very tight circles, rapidly vibrating his pectoral and caudal fins.
  • An overlaid panel's smoothness, used with the proper release agent, vibrators, and vibrating techniques helps to move the air bubbles to the surface.
Synonyms
quiver, shake, tremble, quaver, waver, shiver, shudder, judder, jiggle, wobble; rock, undulate, move, heave, convulse, jerk, jolt, jar; oscillate, vacillate, swing, sway, move to and fro, swing back and forth, swing backwards and forwards, wave, agitate, waggle, wag; North Americanwigwag
1.1 [no object] (vibrate with) Quiver with (a quality or emotion): his voice vibrated with terror
More example sentences
  • His poetry vibrating with emotion and filled with lofty ideals led to his being labelled ‘Prince of Poets’.
  • They vibrate with emotions that do not simply serve the story, but rather power-charge it.
  • Finn had been silent the whole time, listening to her outburst, which varied from flat tones to declarations brimming with passion, vibrating with emotion.
1.2 [no object] (Of a sound) resonate; continue to be heard: a low rumbling sound that began to vibrate through the car
More example sentences
  • The buildings in the centre of Sofia are of impressive proportions and it feels great to hear how they vibrate to the sound and how the music resonates against their windows.
  • They were like bats relying on the sounds vibrating off the room.
  • A loud crackling sound vibrated through the hallway they were in and the bending of metal reached their ears.
Synonyms
throb, reverberate, pulsate, pulse, palpitate, resonate, resound, ring, echo, re-echo, boom, thunder, thump, pound, beat, drum, thud, thrum, hammer; ripple, murmur, hum, drone
rare quop
2 [no object] (Of a pendulum) swing to and fro.
More example sentences
  • Of course, since they'd seen about where it landed, all the dowsers moved in, sticks, wires, and pendula on the alert and vibrating, to help him find the gold.
  • Imagine that you vibrate the pendulum up and down at a frequency of f.

Origin

late Middle English (in the sense 'give out light or sound as if by vibration'): from Latin vibrat- 'moved to and fro', from the verb vibrare.

Definition of vibrate in:

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