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vigour

Line breaks: vig¦our
Pronunciation: /ˈvɪɡə
 
/
(US vigor)

Definition of vigour in English:

noun

[mass noun]
1Physical strength and good health: the springing curls were a sign of vigour and health
More example sentences
  • According to the study, symmetry of face and body suggests health and vigor - and therefore genetic fitness - while asymmetry implies the opposite.
  • You are blessed with good health and vigour, which enable you to participate in busy schedules.
  • ‘We're against apathy,’ he says, setting the juice aside. Renewed health and vigor seems to flow into him as he warms to his topic.
1.1Effort, energy, and enthusiasm: they set about the new task with vigour
More example sentences
  • Such hope lent a spring to their step and vigour to their efforts in the face of determined opposition.
  • And the young cast brings to the production enough raw energy and vigour to leave the audience spellbound.
  • Energy, vigour and emotion were what were missing most in the second-rate acting.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, from Latin vigor, from vigere 'be lively'.

More
  • Vigour and vigorous (Middle English) are from Latin vigor, from vigere ‘be lively’, also found in invigorate (mid 17th century).

Definition of vigour in:

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