Definition of voluble in English:

voluble

Line breaks: vol|uble
Pronunciation: /ˈvɒljʊb(ə)l
 
/

adjective

1(Of a person) talking fluently, readily, or incessantly: she was as voluble as her husband was silent
More example sentences
  • He is able; he is voluble; he's, I think, a very decent man, but again the campaign I think has not been there for him.
  • She is voluble about the support she has received from her family and friends, and the Cincinnati Zoo, whose help in sustaining the project has been crucial.
  • Nervous PR folk and man wielding a hair brush flutter around her nervously as the stunning actress is seated and rapidly surrounded by her voluble fans.
Synonyms
talkative, loquacious, garrulous, verbose, long-winded, wordy, chatty, chattery, gossipy, chattering, babbling, blathering, prattling, jabbering, effusive, gushing, forthcoming, conversational, communicative, expansive, open, unreserved; articulate, eloquent, fluent, glib, silver-tongued
informal mouthy, gabby, gassy, windy, talky, yakking, big-mouthed, with the gift of the gab, having kissed the Blarney Stone
British informal wittering, able to talk the hind legs off a donkey, gobby
rare multiloquent, multiloquous
1.1(Of speech) characterized by fluency and readiness of utterance: an excited and voluble discussion
More example sentences
  • I think I upheld the honour of Scotland by making a voluble speech of thanks.
  • To some extent this is a public, formal persona that is belied by the intimacy and voluble conversation shared by good friends and family members.

Origin

Middle English (in senses 'rotating about an axis' and 'having a tendency to change'): from French, or from Latin volubilis, from volvere 'to roll'. The modern meanings arose in the late 16th century.

Derivatives

volubly

adverb
More example sentences
  • Every single morning newspaper and all the weeklies were spread on the kitchen table, with Bernard alternately lapsing into rage, disgust, amazement, or amusement, all volubly shared with me.
  • Of course, in order to be taken seriously as a scholar while you do much more than your colleagues in the public arena, much more volubly, you must also maintain enormous intellectual credibility.
  • I've always wondered why the people I know who are most into computers seem to be the ones who are most likely to swear at them volubly.

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