Definition of wallop in English:

wallop

Line breaks: wal¦lop
Pronunciation: /ˈwɒləp
 
/
informal

verb (wallops, walloping, walloped)

[with object]
  • 1Strike or hit very hard: they walloped the back of his head with a stick figurative they were tired of getting walloped with income taxes
    More example sentences
    • Cordelia leaned over and walloped him once, hard, on the back.
    • Angrily, he grabbed the first thing that came to hand (a wooden spoon), crossed the room in three strides and walloped Simeon as hard as he could.
    • They dive over the plate to wallop outside pitches up the middle, knowing the inside strike won't be called.
  • 1.1Heavily defeat (an opponent): we were walloped by Milan
    More example sentences
    • True to his ultra-aggressive nature, Lance has decided to wallop his rivals who think he can be had with a psychological blow right out of the gate.
    • Last week was not only good for the Party, it was a triumph for Fox, which walloped its cable rivals and the ‘big three’ networks in the ratings.
    • But Cosmos still remain one of the teams which inflicted a heavy defeat on Bucks when they walloped them 5-1 in a Coca Cola Cup in Umtata a few years ago.

noun

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  • 1A heavy blow or punch: I gave it a wallop with my boot
    More example sentences
    • I must go down to the basement at once with my trusty two-by-four and administer a few more bracing wallops.
    • With that Allardyce stands up and wallops Mark and Lard, leaving them flying into the crowd.
    • It appears that she got a hefty wallop from something heavy, which has pushed her sideways several inches over the edge of her plinth.
  • 1.1 [in singular] chiefly North American A powerful effect: the script packs a wallop
    More example sentences
    • It's a scene that really packs a wallop because it's believable.
    • Whatever accompaniment you choose, tomato water lets its colors shine through but packs a wallop of supporting flavor.
    • Reports are that, like the other quake drinks, it packs a wallop.
  • 2 [mass noun] British Alcoholic drink, especially beer: an endless supply of free wallop
    More example sentences
    • Blossom hill White Zinfandel 2000 Easy drinking and packing a huge fruity wallop, this delicious vintage reeks of luscious, ripe strawberries and cream with a refreshingly crisp finish.
    • Wallop was a slang term for beer, and Codd's wallop came to be used by beer drinkers as a derogatory term for weak or gassy beer, or for soft drinks.
    • In particular, their Jacobite Ale packs a bit of a wallop.

Origin

Middle English (as a noun denoting a horse's gallop): from Old Northern French walop (noun), waloper (verb), perhaps from a Germanic phrase meaning 'run well', from the bases of well1 and leap. Compare with gallop. From 'gallop' the senses 'bubbling noise of a boiling liquid' and then 'sound of a clumsy movement' arose, leading to the current senses.

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