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G1 US English

The seventh letter of the alphabet

G2 US English

Gauss

G New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

7th letter of the alphabet

conductance US English

The degree to which an object conducts electricity, calculated as the ratio of the current that flows to the potential difference present. This is the reciprocal of the resistance, and is measured in siemens or mhos. Symbol: G

gauss US English

A unit of magnetic induction, equal to one ten-thousandth of a tesla

G in gauss US English

A unit of magnetic induction, equal to one ten-thousandth of a tesla

Gibbs free energy US English

A thermodynamic quantity equal to the enthalpy (of a system or process) minus the product of the entropy and the absolute temperature

G in Gibbs free energy US English

A thermodynamic quantity equal to the enthalpy (of a system or process) minus the product of the entropy and the absolute temperature

gravitational constant US English

The constant in Newton’s law of gravitation relating gravity to the masses and separation of particles, equal to 6.67 × 1011N m2 kg2

G in gravitational constant US English

The constant in Newton’s law of gravitation relating gravity to the masses and separation of particles, equal to 6.67 × 1011N m2 kg2

Gauss New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

unit of magnetic induction

giga- New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

denoting a factor of 109, or 230 in computing

g US English

Gas

g New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

acceleration due to gravity

g in G1 US English

The seventh letter of the alphabet

gram US English

A metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram

g in gram1 US English

A metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram

gram New Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors

metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth of a kilogram

g'day US English

Good day

G-man US English

An FBI agent

anti-g US English

Short for antigravity.

G-ride US English

A stolen car

G-spot US English

A sensitive area of the anterior wall of the vagina believed by some to be highly erogenous and capable of ejaculation

G-suit US English

A garment with pressurized pouches that are inflatable with air or fluid, worn by fighter pilots and astronauts to enable them to withstand high forces of acceleration

zero G US English

Zero gravity

G and T US English

A drink of gin and tonic

G-string US English

A garment consisting of a narrow strip of cloth that covers the genitals and is attached to a waistband, worn as underwear or by striptease performers

Grace, W. G. US English

(1848–1915), English cricketer; full name William Gilbert Grace. In a first-class career that lasted until 1908, he made 126 centuries, scored 54,896 runs, and took 2,864 wickets. He twice captained England in Test matches against Australia (1880 and 1882)

Moore, G. E. US English

(1873–1958), English moral philosopher and member of the Bloomsbury Group; full name George Edward Moore

Wells, H. G. US English

(1866–1946), English novelist; full name Herbert George Wells. He wrote some of the earliest science fiction novels, such as The War of the Worlds (1898), which combined political satire with warnings about the powers of science

Ballard, J. G. US English

(1930–2009), British novelist and short-story writer; full name James Graham Ballard. Notable works: The Drowned World (1962), Crash (1973), and Empire of the Sun (1984)

Farrell, J. G. US English

(1935–79), English novelist; full name James Gordon Farrell. Notable works: The Siege of Krishnapur (1973) and The Singapore Grip (1978)

Chesterton, G. K. US English

(1874–1936), English essayist, novelist, and critic; full name Gilbert Keith Chesterton. His novels include The Napoleon of Notting Hill (1904) and a series of detective stories featuring Father Brown, a priest with a talent for crime detection

G's in G1 US English

The seventh letter of the alphabet

G & T in G and T US English

A drink of gin and tonic

MacDiarmid, Alan G. US English

(B.1927), New Zealand chemist, naturalized as an American citizen. He is noted for his work on the discovery and development of conductive polymers, for which with Alan J. Heeger (b.1936) and Hideki Shirakawa (b.1936) he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry (2000)

Robinson, Edward G. US English

(1893–1972), US actor, born in Romania; born Emanuel Goldenberg. He appeared in a number of gangster movies in the 1930s, beginning with Little Caesar (1930). He later played the father in Arthur Miller’s All My Sons (1948)

Beauregard, P. G. T. US English

(1818–93), Confederate army officer; full name Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard. He served as superintendent of the US Military Academy at West Point, but resigned in 1861 to join the Confederacy. He commanded the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter, which officially began the Civil War

Wodehouse, Sir P. G. US English

(1881–1975), English writer; full name Pelham Grenville Wodehouse. His best-known works are humorous stories of the upper-class world of Bertie Wooster and his valet Jeeves, the first of which appeared in 1917

G-men in G-man US English

An FBI agent

zero gravity US English

The state or condition in which there is no apparent force of gravity acting on a body, either because the force is locally weak, or because both the body and its surroundings are freely and equally accelerating under the force

G. verum in bedstraw US English

A herbaceous plant with small, lightly perfumed, white or yellow flowers and whorls of slender leaves. It was formerly used for stuffing mattresses

G. grus in crane2 US English

A tall, long-legged, long-necked bird, typically with white or gray plumage and often with tail plumes and patches of bare red skin on the head. Cranes are noted for their elaborate courtship dances

G. nigra in giant tortoise US English

A very large tortoise with a long lifespan, occurring on several tropical oceanic islands

G. immer in loon2 US English

A large diving waterbird with a sleek black or gray head, a straight pointed bill, and short legs set far back under the body. Loons breed by lakes in northern latitudes and have wailing calls


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