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stone US English

The hard, solid, nonmetallic mineral matter of which rock is made, especially as a building material

as cold as ice US English

Very cold

Stone, Edward Durell US English

(1902–78), US architect. His notable designs include the Museum of Modern Art in New York City 1937–39; the US embassy in New Delhi, India 1954–58; and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC 1964–69

Stone, Harlan Fiske US English

(1872–1946), US chief justice 1941–46. He was the dean of the Columbia Law School 1910–24 and, briefly, US attorney general 1924 in President Coolidge’s cabinet before he was appointed to the US Supreme Court as an associate justice 1925–41. He was named chief justice by President Franklin D. Roosevelt

Stone, Lucy US English

(1818–93), US feminist and abolitionist. The first woman from Massachusetts to earn a college degree (Oberlin College 1847), she traveled widely during the 1850s lecturing on women’s rights. In 1869, she founded the American Woman Suffrage Association, which merged with the National Woman Suffrage Association in 1890 to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association

Stone, Oliver US English

(1946-), US movie director, screenwriter, and producer. He won Academy Awards for his adaptation of the novel Midnight Express (1978) and for his direction of Platoon (1986) and Born on the Fourth of July (1989), both of which indict US involvement in the Vietnam War. Other notable movies: JFK (1991) and Natural Born Killers (1994)

stone me! in stone US English

An exclamation of surprise or shock

stone me! US English

An exclamation of surprise or shock

Stone Age US English

A prehistoric period when weapons and tools were made of stone or of organic materials such as bone, wood, or horn

Bath stone US English

A type of oolitic limestone found especially near Bath in SW England, grey to yellowish in colour and used in building and sculpture

Black Stone US English

The sacred reddish-black stone built into the outside wall of the Kaaba and ritually touched by Muslim pilgrims

china stone US English

Partly kaolinized granite containing plagioclase feldspar, ground and mixed with kaolin to make porcelain

Coade stone US English

An artificial stone claimed to have greater resistance to frost and heat than natural stone, formerly much used for statues, decorative work, etc.

rune stone US English

A large stone carved with runes by ancient Scandinavians or Anglo-Saxons

stone boat US English

A flat-bottomed sled used for transporting stones and other heavy objects

stone broke US English

Entirely without money

stone china US English

A kind of very hard earthenware resembling porcelain

stone cold US English

Completely cold

stone crab US English

A large, heavy, edible crab of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean area

stone dead US English

Completely dead

stone deaf US English

Completely deaf

stone face US English

A face that reveals no emotions

stone fruit US English

A fruit with flesh or pulp enclosing a stone, such as a peach, plum, or cherry

stone lily US English

A fossilized sea lily

stone pine US English

An umbrella-shaped southern European pine tree with large needles, very large glossy brown cones, and edible seeds (“pine nuts”)

water stone US English

A whetstone used with water rather than oil

coping stone US English

chiefly British term for copestone.

curling stone US English

A large, polished, circular stone with an iron handle on top, used in the game of curling

kidney stone US English

A hard mass formed in the kidneys, typically consisting of insoluble calcium compounds; a renal calculus

paving stone US English

A large, flat piece of stone or similar material, used in paving

rolling stone US English

A person who is unwilling to settle for long in one place

Rosetta Stone US English

An inscribed stone found near Rosetta on the western mouth of the Nile in 1799. Its text is written in three scripts: hieroglyphic, demotic, and Greek. The deciphering of the hieroglyphs by Jean-François Champollion in 1822 led to the interpretation of many other early records of Egyptian civilization

rocking stone US English

A boulder poised in such a way that it can be easily rocked

stone circle US English

A megalithic monument of a type found mainly in western Europe, consisting of stones, typically standing stones, arranged more or less in a circle

stone curlew US English

another term for thick-knee.

stone marten US English

A Eurasian marten that has chocolate-brown fur with a white throat

Moabite Stone US English

A monument erected by Mesha, king of Moab, in circa 850 bc which describes (in an early form of the Hebrew language) the campaign between Moab and ancient Israel (2 Kings 3), and bears an early example of an inscription in the Phoenician alphabet. It is now in the Louvre in Paris

living stone US English

A small succulent southern African plant that resembles a pebble in appearance. It consists of two fleshy cushionlike leaves divided by a slit through which a daisylike flower emerges

Portland stone US English

Limestone from the Isle of Portland in Dorset, highly prized as a building material

precious stone US English

A highly attractive and valuable piece of mineral or rock, used especially in jewelry; a gemstone

be written in stone in stone US English

Used to emphasize that something is fixed and unchangeable

stone-coloured US English

Of a neutral shade of whitish or brownish grey

Stone Mountain US English

A granite mass east of Atlanta, Georgia, site of the Confederate Memorial Carving, the world’s largest bas-relief sculpture, which features the figures of Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, all on horseback

standing stone US English

another term for menhir.

foundation stone US English

A stone laid at a ceremony to celebrate the beginning of construction of a building

heart of stone in heart US English

A stern or cruel nature

heart of stone US English

A stern or cruel nature

Stone of Scone US English

The stone on which medieval Scottish kings were crowned. It was brought to England by Edward I and preserved in the coronation chair in Westminster Abbey, and returned to Scotland in 1996. Also called Coronation stone, Stone of Destiny

New Stone Age US English

another name for the Neolithic (see Neolithic).

Old Stone Age US English

The Paleolithic period


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